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AFRICAN AMERICAN ART

PDF document with select African American art references download here

Me and Uncle Romie: a story inspired by the life and art of Romare Bearden
by Claire Hartfield ; paintings by Jerome Lagarrigue

Author: Hartfield, Claire

A boy from North Carolina spends the summer in New York City visiting the neighborhood of Harlem, where his uncle, collage artist Romare Bearden, grew up. Includes a biographical sketch of Bearden and instructions on making a story collage.


New York: Dial Books for Young Readers, c2002, unpaged

Reviews for this Title:
Booklist Review: K-Gr. 3. The work of the landmark Harlem Renaissance painter Romare Bearden is the story behind the story in this handsome picture book that shows how he used paint and collage to create his amazing art. Told as fiction through the eyes of Bearden’s young nephew James, who is visiting New York City from North Carolina, the words and pictures express what James sees and feels in the exciting neighborhood streets, what he remembers of home, and how the storytelling scraps relate to Bearden’s art. Lagarrigue, who illustrated Nikki Grimes’ My Man Blue (1999), once again uses expressive paintings to capture the “beat and bounce” of the city and the powerful bond between a boy and a loving father figure. This would be a stimulating model for art classes, and Hartfield ends with a useful double-page spread encouraging students to create their own storytelling combinations. The collage elements in Lagarrigue’s vibrant acrylic pictures are less prominent than in Bearden’s own work, but they add depth and rhythm to the beautiful painterly narrative that will introduce many children to the famous artist’s life and work.
(Reviewed February 15, 2003) -- Hazel Rochman

School Library Journal Review: Gr 2-4–This vibrant, evocative picture book presents a fictionalized version of Harlem Renaissance artist Bearden through the eyes of a nephew visiting from North Carolina. At first, young James catches only glimpses of his busy, distracted Uncle Romie and quickly decides that this elusive giant of a man must not be much fun. He makes collages, which seems awfully easy, and he's always shut away behind the closed door of his studio. James passes most of his time in New York with his Aunt Nanette, who comes across as a warm, willowy, Caribbean Earth Mother. When the boy's birthday rolls around, however, she has to go to a funeral, leaving only Uncle Romie for company. To James's pleasant surprise, his uncle knows how to have fun and even knows about baseball. Lagarrigue's lush, acrylic illustrations with collage elements recall the tones, brush strokes, and mixture of media that saturate Bearden's groundbreaking work. An author's note acknowledges that Hartfield's story is fiction and provides basic biographical information about the artist. Thumbnail reproductions from Bearden's work round out the narrative.–Catherine Threadgill, Charleston County Public Library, SC (Reviewed December 1, 2002) (School Library Journal, vol 48, issue 12, p97)

Publishers Weekly Review: Art inventively imitates art in this engaging volume. Newcomer Hartfield's fictional tale draws upon the work of collage artist Bearden who, as a child, moved from his native North Carolina to Harlem. Lagarrigue's (My Man Blue) softly focused acrylic paintings introduce collage elements as they effectively evoke the story's period setting, which shifts from the rural South to Manhattan. While his mother awaits the birth of twins, narrator James travels by train to visit his Aunt Nanette and Uncle Romie, who is working hard to finish paintings for his upcoming art show. The man remains behind the closed doors of his studio as his wife shows their nephew the sights of the city. Lagarrigue retains his own style while incorporating the turquoise, brick red, fuschia and other hues so prominent in Bearden's work; the compositions of his cityscapes in particular recall the giant collage The Block (1971). James becomes enamored of bustling Harlem, where he plays stickball and partakes in a rooftop barbecue. On his birthday, the lad wanders into his uncle's studio and is thrilled to discover that Bearden's art captures his favorite spot: "Looking at Uncle Romie's paintings, I could feelHarlem—its beat and bounce." In the satisfying ending, James, back at home with his new twin siblings, feels inspired to create his own collage as a birthday gift for his uncle. Concluding tips on making collages may well encourage readers to do the same. Ages 5-up. (Dec.)
— Staff (Reviewed November 11, 2002) (Publishers Weekly, vol 249, issue 45, p63)

Kirkus Reviews This tribute to collage artist Romare Bearden is movingly executed in a fictionalized story of young James, who visits his aunt and uncle in New York while his parents adjust to the arrival of twins. James is a little nervous; Uncle Romie and Aunt Nanette don't have any kids, and a picture of Uncle Romie makes him look a little scary. Who will bake him a lemon cake and take him to the baseball game on his birthday? Aunt Nanette turns out to be warmhearted and welcoming, but Uncle Romie, busy with his art, seems a little distant. When the big day arrives, Uncle Romie turns out to be more fun that James anticipated. When James enters the art studio for the first time, he recognizes Harlem in Romie's collage paintings that he'd previously dismissed as "kinda easy" to make, and he sees one that reminds him of North Carolina, where Uncle Romie also grew up. Uncle and nephew bond a little over shared memories of home, and then Uncle Romie surprises James with tickets to the ballgame. Aunt Nanette is back in time for cake, and by the time James goes home, his horizons have expanded not only in terms of his family, but in his appreciation for other places and for the power of art. So many things at home now remind him of Uncle Romie that he makes a collage birthday card for him featuring train schedules, tiger lilies, a subway token and subway map, and his own painting. Lagarrigue's (Freedom Summer, 2001, etc.) collage artwork, like Bearden's, possesses a real feel for the Harlem setting without actually being realistic. He conveys the essence of the place through bits of paper, darkly colored paint, and impressionistically blurry portrayals of people and scenes. A guide at the back to help young artists create their own collages enhances this fitting introduction to an American artist. (Picture book. 5-8)
(Kirkus Reviews, December 1, 2002)



Other Contributors:
Lagarrigue, Jerome: ill

ISBNs Associated with this Title:
0803725205 : Reinforced binding - Juvenile


Credits:
• Novelist/EBSCO Publishing
• Baker & Taylor
• Booklist, published by the American Library Association
• School Library Journal, A Reed Elsevier Business Information Publication
• Publishers Weekly, A Reed Elsevier Business Information Publication
• Copyright 2005, VNU Business Media, Inc. All Rights Reserved
• Added to NoveList: 20030220
• TID: 118745

Just How I Picture It in My Mind: Contemporary African American Quilts from the Montgomery Museum of Fine Art
Format Hardcover
Edition ILLUSTRATE
Subject Art / Folk Art
ISBN/SKU 089280047X
Author Mary Elizabeth Johnson Huff
Publisher River City Pub
Publish Date February 2006

Story Painter: The Life of Jacob Lawrence
John Duggleby
Meaningful biographies are written to touch the heart and soul of the reader and to shed light on a person's life. I hope teachers will not overlook this rich, moving biography of Jacob Lawrence. Lawrence is one of the most famous African-American painters of the 20th century. Although he grew up in the midst of the Harlem Renaissance, he knew firsthand the sting of prejudice and the sorrow of his people. Duggleby uses the artist's paintings to allow readers to see into Lawrence's world. It is only 53 pages, but what a wallop it packs. 1998, Chronicle, Ages 10 up, $16.95. Reviewer: Jan Lieberman
ISBN: 0-8118-2082-3

Talking with Tebé: Clementine Hunter, Memory Artist
Edited by Mary E. Lyons
This compelling biography of an African-American sharecropper who gained national recognition as a self-taught artist blends southern history with the story of a spirited, independent woman worth knowing about. Born in 1886, Clementine Hunter remembered seeing her father pick four hundred pounds of cotton in a day. She herself set babies on the end of a cotton row, while she worked for less than two dollars a day. Clementine painted her first picture on a shoebox top with old tubes of paint found in a wastebasket. Before she died in 1988, at the age of 101, her work had been displayed in museums across the country. Editor Mary Lyons has masterfully pieced together audio and print interviews to allow Clementine to tell her amazing story in her own words. The result is an intimate visit with a woman who expressed her soul through art created late at night after a full day's work. Color illustrations give examples of Hunter's work with informative captions. Art teachers will be delighted by the elegant explanation of folk art. Social studies teachers will love the vivid historical lessons. Every reader who comes in contact with this book will be enriched. 1998, Houghton Mifflin, Ages 9 to 12, $16.00. Reviewer: Jackie Hechtkopf
ISBN: 0-395-72031-1


Wake up our souls: a celebration of Black American artists
Tonya Bolden

Author: Bolden, Tonya

Presents a history of African American visual arts and artists from the days of slavery to the present.
New York: H.N. Abrams; [Washington, D.C.]: Published in association with the Smithsonian American Art Museum, 2004, 128 p. Notes:
Includes bibliographical references (p. 123-125) and index.


ISBNs Associated with this Title:
0810945274 : Hardcover - Juvenile


Credits:
• Novelist/EBSCO Publishing
• Baker & Taylor
• Added to NoveList: 20050320
• TID: 132585

The Beginner's Guide to Collecting Fine Art, African American Style
Format Paperback
Edition UNABRIDGED
Subject
ISBN/SKU 0966309405
Author Ana M. Allen
Publisher Positiv Productions
Publish Date February 1998

Li'l Dan, the drummer boy: a Civil War story
Romare Bearden

Author: Bearden, Romare, 1911-1988

When a company of black Union soldiers tells L'il Dan that he is no longer a slave, he follows them, and uses his beloved drum to save them from attack.


New York: Simon & Schuster Books for Young Readers, c2003, 40 p.

Notes:
Maya Angelou reads the story aloud on accompanying CD
Illustrated by the author


Reviews for this Title:
Booklist Review: K-Gr. 3. Renowned African American artist Bearden, who died in 1988, wrote and illustrated this story about a slave boy who lives on a Southern plantation. Li’l Dan makes himself a drum and uses it to imitate the sounds around him: singing people, cawing birds, clacking leaves, and crashing thunder. After the Union army liberates him, Dan follows the soldiers of Company E, becomes their “mascot,” and saves them from a Confederate cavalry unit with his remarkable drumming. Bearden’s illustrations are expressive, and some are quite wonderful, but children may find it odd that Dan looks different from page to page, partly because the artist’s style varies and partly because Dan’s size and proportions seem to fluctuate. Still, children will enjoy the book as a Civil War story featuring a courageous African American boy, and adults will appreciate it as the only picture book Bearden left behind. Maya Angelou reads the story aloud quite effectively on the accompanying CD.
-- Carolyn Phelan (BookList, 10-15-2003, p415)

School Library Journal Review: /* Starred Review */ Gr 1-4–This recently discovered work by the renowned African-American artist is not to be missed. It is the story of Li'l Dan, a slave on the Hollis plantation, who listens nightly to Mr. Ned play his drum from faraway Africa. As he learns more, he makes his own drum, practicing all of the sounds he hears. When black Union soldiers tell him that he's free, he follows them. A short time later, he uses his drum to save his new friends from enemy attack and is congratulated by General Sherman. Although the story is worthy in its own right, the 21 mixed-media paintings are the outstanding element here. With rich colors and bold black outlines, the dramatic art shows the influence of abstract expressionism. Brilliant blue Union uniforms and dark skin stand out against the white spaces, and text and art are in perfect balance. Beginning letters on many pages also reflect the illustrations in color, shape, and style. The simplicity of primary colors and abstract figures express so much more than the text alone. There is no doubt about Dan's intensity as he listens to the sounds of the woods and taps out the song with his fingertips. Li'l Dan is small–seemingly insignificant against the large soldiers in their striking uniforms. Yet his strength and self-assurance fill the page when he confidently strikes out the cannon fire. On the accompanying CD, Maya Angelou's mellow voice and easy pace complement this beautiful, creative work.–Carolyn Janssen, Children's Learning Center of the Public Library of Cincinnati and Hamilton County, OH (Reviewed October 1, 2003) (School Library Journal, vol 49, issue 10, p114)

Kirkus Reviews Recently discovered, this is Bearden's only work for children. Li'l Dan was a slave on the Hollis plantation, and every day after work, he came to hear Mr. Ned play his African drum. And each day Mr. Ned taught Dan how to play that drum. Eventually, Dan makes his own drum, perfects his skills, and goes off with the Union army. He becomes a hero when his drumming warns his troops of an impending attack from Confederate troops. Li'l Dan is congratulated by General William Tecumseh Sherman and is invited to join the army's drum corps. Mixed-media art enhances the text and serves as a fine introduction to Bearden's work. An introduction by Dr. Henry Louis Gates and a CD with Maya Angelou's reading of the story are included. An important find for the world of children's literature. (Picture book. 4-8)
(Kirkus Reviews, August 1, 2003)



Other titles associated with this book:
Li'l Dan, the drummer boy: a Civil War story
Little Dan, the drummer boy


ISBNs Associated with this Title:
0689862377 : Reinforced binding - Juvenile


Credits:
• Novelist/EBSCO Publishing
• Baker & Taylor
• Booklist, published by the American Library Association
• School Library Journal, A Reed Elsevier Business Information Publication
• Copyright 2005, VNU Business Media, Inc. All Rights Reserved
• Added to NoveList: 20040220
• TID: 122197

 

Rhapsodies in Black: Art of the Harlem Renaissance
Format Paperback
Subject Art / Collections, Catalogs, Exhibitions
ISBN/SKU 0520212681
Author Richard J. Powell (EDT)
Publisher Univ of California Pr
Publish Date September 1997

Annotation
Explores the paintings, photographs, and performances significant to the Harlem Renaissance

Harlem Renaissance Artists
Format School and Library
Subject Juvenile Nonfiction / General
ISBN/SKU 1588106497
Author Denise Jordan
Publisher Heinemann Library
Publish Date March 2003

Annotation
Discusses the characteristics of the Harlem Renaissance art movement which flourished in Harlem, New York, in the 1920s and presents biographies of eleven artists.


Review
Gr 6-8-Brief overviews of significant 20th-century art movements. Each book includes an introduction to the period, sections offering social and historical context, and profiles of 11 or 12 major artists. All of the two- to four-page biographical sketches begin with a box of key facts and works, followed by details of the artists' early life and influential colleagues, and representations of their art. Sidebars offer facts about other period artists. The information provided is interesting, but at times repetitive. Quality black-and-white photographs, color reproductions, and colorful edging provide visual interest. A number of the reproductions are full page, but some of them are much smaller. These volumes can fill a need for introductory material about some of the key artists during these periods and may even encourage readers to seek out additional sources and reproductions.-Linda Wadleigh, Oconee County Middle School, Watkinsville, GA Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information

Lullabies: an illustrated songbook

Author: Various Authors

The art of Mary Cassat, Vincent Van Gogh, Annibale Carracci, Romare Bearden, and Kate Greenway accompanies the text and music of traditional lullabies


Other Contributors: Kapp, Richard; Vaughan, Carolyn: editor

New York: The Metropolitan Museum of Art, 1997, 96 p.
ISBNs Associated with this Title:
0152017283 : Reinforced binding - Juvenile


Credits:
• Novelist/EBSCO Publishing
• Baker & Taylor
• Added to NoveList: 20041020
• TID: 129048

Creating Their Own Image: The History of African-American Women Artists
Format Hardcover
Subject Art / History / American
ISBN/SKU 019516721X
Author Lisa E. Farrington
Publisher Oxford Univ Pr
Publish Date January 2005
Annotation
An expansive collection of artists, styles, and periods are woven together into a survey that demonstrates how African-American women artists have created an alternative vision of how women of color can, are, and might be presented in American culture.


Review
The story of African American women artists is the story of overcoming racism and sexism and responding to black female stereotypes. In Creating Their Own Image, the first book-length history of African American women artists, Farrington begins with the days of enslavement and moves through the nineteenth century to the Harlem Renaissance, the civil rights era, and the present, profiling individual artists and chronicling their part in the long battle black women artists continue to fight to reclaim their own image and secure equality in the art world. A richly detailed yet fluent work of trailblazing research, fresh interpretations, and cogent argument, Farrington's treatise discusses vital aesthetic as well as social and cultural issues and creates a vibrant context for such seminal artists as Augusta Savage, Faith Ringgold, Barbara Chase-Riboud, Kara Walker, and many more. ((Reviewed February 1, 2005)) Copyright 2005 Booklist Reviews.

Art by African-American Artists Selections from the 20th Century: A Resource for Educators
Format Paperback
Edition PACKAGE
Subject Art / History / Asian
ISBN/SKU 0300103689
Author Not Available (NA)
Publisher Yale Univ Pr
Publish Date May 2004

Seventeen black artists

Author: Fax, Elton C., 1909-

Views the artistic careers of Black men and women whose creations in such media as painting, sculpture, and photography reveal many aspects of the Black experience


Dodd, 1971, 306 p.

ISBNs Associated with this Title:
0396063918 : Hardcover


Credits:
• Hennepin County Public Library
• Baker & Taylor
• Novelist/EBSCO Publishing
• Added to NoveList: 20010101
• TID: 078180

African American Art and Artists
Format Paperback
Edition REV&EXPAND
Subject Art / History / African
ISBN/SKU 0520239350
Author Samella Lewis
Publisher Univ of California Pr
Publish Date February 2003
Annotation
Examines the lives and works of African American artists from the eighteenth century to the present, with biographical and critical text and illustrated examples of their work.


Review
At its first appearance in 1978 as Art: African American (CH, Jul'79) and especially with the second, revised edition, African American Art and Artists (1990), Lewis's topical and biographical survey became a classic. This new edition continues the format and high quality of its predecessors, includes a new and very fine introduction by Mary Jane Hewitt that provides much information on Lewis (Scripps College) and her significant contributions to this area of study, an expanded conclusion, a longer bibliography, and, most significantly, a new 35-page section, "From Painting to Technology: Art before and into the New Millennium," treating 1990-2002. Some 12 new artists and 28 new images are included in this section: four painters, three sculptors, two installation artists, two mixed-media artists, and one digital/computer artist. A spot-check of numerous pages suggests that there are no revisions to the five sections from the 1990 edition that are repeated here,: 1610-1865, "Cultural Deprivation and Slavery"; 1865-1920, "Emancipation and Cultural Dilemma"; 1920-1940, "New Americanism and Ethnic Identity"; 1940-1960, "Social and Political Awareness"; and 1960-1990, "Political and Cultural Awareness." Since there is little new material, those interested in purchasing this latest edition may wish to acquire the paperbound version at lower cost. Summing Up: Highly recommended. General readers; lower-division undergraduates through faculty. Copyright 2003 American Library Association


African-American Artists, 1929-1945: Prints, Drawings, and Paintings in the Metropolitan Museum of Art
Format Paperback
Subject Art / General
ISBN/SKU 0300098774
Author Metropolitan Museum of Art (New York, N.Y.) (Cor)
Publisher Yale Univ Pr
Publish Date February 2003
Review
This catalog reproduces a small portion of the Metropolitan Museum of Art's African American holdings. Since 1942, the collection has quietly grown to more than 500 works representing the diversity of an often-overlooked faction of American artists. The exhibition included several of the 204 prints donated by Reba Williams and Dave Williams in 1999. As a consequence, prints dominate the catalog and are supported by Rachel Mustalish's useful historical overview of printmaking practices. The chronology of the exhibition covered the most active early years of African American visual art production. Artists like Jacob Lawrence and James Wells were heirs to the enlightened New Negro Arts movement, which came to a close around 1929. Thereafter, a steadily growing number of artists came into their own under the auspices of federally funded New Deal programs that lasted until the end of WW II. Messinger's introduction offers an overview of the Museum's collecting practices during those years and revisits earlier exhibitions devoted to African American art. The 47 works featured in the catalog, individually described by art historian Collins, are set within categories like portraiture and recreation. ^BSumming Up: Highly recommended. General readers; lower- and upper-division undergraduates. Copyright 2003 American Library Association


Aaron Douglas: Art, Race, and the Harlem Renaissance
Format Paperback
Subject Biography & Autobiography / People Of Color
ISBN/SKU 0878058001
Author Amy Helene Kirschke
Publisher Univ Pr of Mississippi
Publish Date July 1995

Review
The value of this biography of the great African American artist Aaron Douglas is its coverage of the basic elements reflecting his artistic significance and contributions. Much of the historical material on the Harlem Renaissance is derivative and can be found in more comprehensive scholarly sources. Chapter 1 gives valuable information on Douglas's childhood and the sources of his artistic inspiration and ambition; subsequent chapters affirm the importance of the Harlem Renaissance and its impact on his life and art, as well as that of African American leaders and organizations such as Charles Johnson and the Urban League, and W.E.B. DuBois and the NAACP. Kirschke also traces the influence of the Scandinavian artist Winold Reiss and African art to Douglas's development, connecting the artists to Renaissance themes and concerns. Mentioned prominently are such books as Alain Locke's The New Negro (1925), which featured Douglas's art, and the magazine covers of The Crisis and Opportunity, for which Douglas provided many classic illustrations. Another important feature of the biography is its compilation of illustrations with their sources and locations, including works from the Fisk University murals, the Schomberg Center for Research on Black Culture, and the Fisk University Special Collections. All levels. Copyright 1999 American Library Association

The Art of History: African American Women Artists Engage the Past
Format Paperback
Subject Social Science / African-American Studies
ISBN/SKU 0813530229
Author Lisa Gail Collins
Publisher Rutgers Univ Pr
Publish Date May 2002
Review
Collins, an art historian at Vassar, is a bit academic in tone, but that won't deter readers. This is a perceptive study of the forthright work of contemporary African American women painters, sculptors, photographers, and installation artists. Collins begins by noting a paradoxical aspect of African American thought, a simultaneous "preoccupation with visual culture and a neglect of visual art and artists." Why, she asks, has black art remained marginalized while black music and literature thrive? Collins concludes that images, especially portraits, possess a uniquely volatile power, and that the disregard of black art is the result of the ways slavery, ongoing racism, and class conflict have politicized the depiction of African Americans, especially women. Many of today's black women artists, including Carrie Mae Weems, Lorna Simpson, Alison Saar, Beverly Buchanan, Clarissa Sligh, and Julie Dash, confront this predicament by trenchantly addressing the historic and current provocation of the black female body, and critiquing society's shying away from black art, efforts undertaken with the noble intention of breaking down old barriers and liberating art, artists, and viewers. ((Reviewed March 1, 2002)) Copyright 2002 Booklist Reviews

Allan Rohan Crite: Artist-Reporter of the African American Community
Format Paperback
Subject Art / History / General
ISBN/SKU 0962460249
Author Julie Levin Caro
Publisher Univ of Washington Pr
Publish Date July 2001

Review
Published in conjunction with the May 2001 exhibition at the Frye Art Museum, this catalogue presents 53 color reproductions of the work of artist Allan Rohan Crite, whose paintings illustrate everyday activities or seemingly insignificant moments. Four essays provide introductory information and commentary on the Crite and his work. Distributed by the U. of Washington Press. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)


African American Visual Artists: An Annotated Bibliography of Educational Resource Materials
Format Hardcover
Subject Art / Fine Arts
ISBN/SKU 0810837226
Author Daniel J. Frye
Publisher Rowman & Littlefield Pub Inc
Publish Date February 2001
Annotation
Discusses the role of African-American artists in American art history, and lists resources on individual artists, including general works, surveys, children's books, and books on artist groups and movements.


Review
Lists selected substantive, easily accessible and relatively inexpensive resources about African American visual artists, with a total of 739 resources referencing 1,174 artists. These resources provide information about individual artists and the contexts in which they are situated. Most resources were published after 1981. Entries are divided into five sections on general works, surveys, children's books, artists, and artist groups and movements. Three of the five sections offer descriptive annotations. A list of sources presents companies, institutions, and agencies likely to carry resource materials. An introductory essay helps locate African American artists within American art history. Frye is an artist and art educator. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)



Harlem Renaissance: Art of Black America
Format Hardcover
Subject
ISBN/SKU 0810981289
Author David C. Driskell (EDT)
Publisher Abradale/Abrams
Publish Date March 1994

Annotation
Presents the work of today's most important visual artists, including that of such painters and sculptors as Meta Warrick Fuller, Aaron Douglas, Palmer Hayden, and William H. Johnson.

New Negro Artists in Paris: African American Painters and Sculptors in the City of Light, 1922-1934
Format Paperback
Subject Art / History / American
ISBN/SKU 0813528119
Author Theresa Leininger-Miller
Publisher Rutgers Univ Pr
Publish Date November 2000


Review
Leininger-Miller's (art history, U. of Cincinnati) very readable revision of her dissertation surveys the lives and oeuvre of six African-American artists Nancy Elizabeth Prophet, Palmer Hayden, Hale Woodruff, Archibald J. Motley Jr., Augusta Savage, and Albert Alexander Smith with special attention to their years in the rich cultural milieu of Jazz Age Paris. The book is well-illustrated and approachable and will appeal to art historians and anyone interested in art of this time period and the experience as African-Americans of these artists both at home and abroad. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

Murals of John Thomas Biggers: American Muralist, African American Artist
Format Paperback
Subject
ISBN/SKU 0961698292
Author Olive Theisen
Publisher Hampton Univ
Publish Date January 1999

The Emergence of the African-American Artist: Robert S. Duncanson 1821-1872
Format Paperback
Edition REPRINT
Subject Biography & Autobiography / Artists, Architects, Photographers
ISBN/SKU 0826209742
Author Joseph D. Ketner
Publisher Univ of Missouri Pr
Publish Date August 1994

A History of African-American Artists: From 1792 to the Present
Format Hardcover
Subject Art / History / General
ISBN/SKU 0394570162
Author Romare Bearden
Publisher Random House Inc
Publish Date November 1993

Li'L Dan, the Drummer Boy: A Civil War Story
Format School and Library
Edition BOOK & CD
Subject Juvenile Fiction / Historical / United States / 19th Century
ISBN/SKU 0689862377
Author Romare Bearden
Publisher Simon & Schuster
Publish Date August 2003

Annotation
Accompanied by a CD read by Maya Angelou, a powerful picture book, written by a legendary American artist, details the story of a young slave who teaches himself to play the drum and saves the Union soldiers from attack--an act of courage that earns him a place in the Army Drum Corps.


Review
K-Gr. 3. Renowned African American artist Bearden, who died in 1988, wrote and illustrated this story about a slave boy who lives on a Southern plantation. Li'l Dan makes himself a drum and uses it to imitate the sounds around him: singing people, cawing birds, clacking leaves, and crashing thunder. After the Union army liberates him, Dan follows the soldiers of Company E, becomes their "mascot," and saves them from a Confederate cavalry unit with his remarkable drumming. Bearden's illustrations are expressive, and some are quite wonderful, but children may find it odd that Dan looks different from page to page, partly because the artist's style varies and partly because Dan's size and proportions seem to fluctuate. Still, children will enjoy the book as a Civil War story featuring a courageous African American boy, and adults will appreciate it as the only picture book Bearden left behind. Maya Angelou reads the story aloud quite effectively on the accompanying CD. ((Reviewed October 15, 2003)) Copyright 2003 Booklist Reviews

Romare Bearden: Collage of Memories
Format Hardcover
Subject Juvenile Nonfiction / Biography & Autobiography / Art
ISBN/SKU 0810945894
Author Jan Greenberg
Publisher Harry N Abrams Inc
Publish Date September 2003

Annotation
Recounts the life of the twentieth-century African-American collage artist who used his southern childhood, New York City, jazz, and Paris to influence his bold and meaningful art.


Review
From the first spread, Greenberg (without frequent collaborator Sandra Jordan) draws readers into a dynamic portrait of African-American painter and collage artist Romare Bearden. "Painted paper scissored into shapes. Scraps of fabric. Hands cut from a photograph," the book begins; in a kind of textual collage, blocks of words appear on bold patches of solid color that echo the checkered floor in the artist's Early Carolina Morning, 1978, featured on the spread. The often poetic narrative reinforces the inviting artwork: "Step inside Bearden's world, where jazz, rhythm, and blues meet a kaleidoscope of shimmering, shimmying colors." Greenberg discusses the importance of Bearden's North Carolina childhood to his later work (emphasized by compositions such as Dinner Before the Revival Meeting, 1978), and intersperses photographs that demonstrate how young Romie's light skin posed challenges in a segregated South. A brilliantly designed spread for The Street, 1964, shows off the myriad tones between black and white in an homage to his beloved Harlem. Bearden's mother, a renowned Harlem newspaper editor and activist, introduced him to the likes of Langston Hughes and Duke Ellington, and his brush with Harlem Renaissance royalty shows up in paintings such as Show Time, 1974. Some of the gems come off as almost parenthetical: a childhood friend who influenced his artistic approach (eulogized in Farewell Eugene, 1978) and a brief flirtation with abstract expressionism (e.g., Mountains of the Moon, 1956). This intelligent volume provides a way into the artwork for youngest readers (and includes enough engrossing details to keep their interest) and new and interesting nuggets for more experienced art lovers and fans of African-American history and culture. Ages 4-8. (Sept.) Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information.

 

Harlem Photographs 1928-1960
Format Paperback
Subject Photography / Individual Photographer
ISBN/SKU 0929445112
Author James Van Der Zee (PHT)
Publisher Client Distribution Services
Publish Date November 2004

Something To Look Forward To: An Exhibition Featuring Abstract Art By 22 Distinguished Americans Of African Descent: Franklin And Marshall College Lancaster, Pennsylvania, March 2
Format Paperback
Subject Art / Collections, Catalogs, Exhibitions
ISBN/SKU 0910626022
Author April Kingsley
Publisher Univ of Washington Pr
Publish Date January 2005

Come Look With Me: Discovering African American Art for Children
Format Hardcover
Subject Juvenile Nonfiction / Art / History
ISBN/SKU 1890674079
Author Jr. Rolling, James Haywood
Publisher Lickle Pub Inc
Publish Date December 2004

Review
Lickle Publishing adds two titles to its Come Look with Me series: Discovering African American Art for Children by James Haywood Rolling Jr., and Discovering Women Artists for Children by Jennifer Tarr Coyne. After a brief suggestion of "How to use this book," each of the dozen works appears with several questions as discussion starters, a brief biography of the artist and some background on the painting's theme. In the first title, accessible subjects such as Henry Ossawa Tanner's The Banjo Lesson (1893), Jacob Lawrence's Brownstones (1958) and Sarah Albritton's more recent The Swimming Hole (1993) allow readers to easily recognize art's timeless appeal. In the second book, paintings by Frida Kahlo, Georgia O'Keeffe and Mary Cassatt similarly demonstrate the range of human experience. (Mar.) Copyright 2005 Reed Business Information.

A Century of African American Art: The Paul R. Jones Collection
Format Hardcover
Subject Art / History / American
ISBN/SKU 0813534569
Author Amalia K. Amaki (EDT)
Publisher Rutgers Univ Pr
Publish Date November 2004

Annotation
Ten essays that examine four key issues in American art--portraiture and realism in relation to abstract expressionism, the implications of color, the role of narrative, and the concept of multiple originals--come together in this resource on the works of African-American art included in the Paul R. Jones collection. Simultaneous.

Furious Flower: African American Poetry from the Black Arts Movement to the Present
Format Paperback
Subject Poetry / Anthologies (Multiple Authors)
ISBN/SKU 0813922534
Author Joanne V. Gabbin (EDT)
Publisher Univ of Virginia Pr
Publish Date February 2004
Table of Contents
Preface xv
Introduction xvii
Gwendolyn Brooks (1917-2000)
The Second Sermon on the Warpland
3 (1)
Winnie
4 (1)
A Bronzeville Mother Loiters in Mississippi. Meanwhile, a Mississippi Mother Burns Bacon.
5 (4)
We Real Cool
9 (1)
The Near Johannesburg Boy
10 (1)
Uncle Seagram
11 (3)
Samuel Allen (b. 1917)
The Apple Trees in Sussex
14 (1)
A Moment, Please
15 (1)
The Lingering Doubt
16 (1)
To Satch
17 (5)
Adam David Miller (b. 1922)
My Trip 19
22 (1)
Forever Afternoon

Song of the Wheel
23 (2)
Pinkie Gordon Lane (b. 1923)
Girl at the Window
25 (1)
Lyric: I Am Looking at Music
25 (1)
Children
26 (3)
Naomi Long Madgett (b. 1923)
Reluctant Light
29 (1)
The Last Happy Day
30 (3)
Packrat
33 (2)
Dolores Kendrick (b. 1927)
For Gwendolyn Brooks: As I Civilize a Space
35 (1)
Where the Grieved Ones Sat
36 (2)
The Drowned River
38 (3)
Raymond R. Patterson (1929-2001)
Harlem Suite
41 (2)
Forerunner
43 (1)
Baobab
44 (2)
Alvin Aubert (b. 1930)
Nat Turner in the Clearing
46 (1)
James Baldwin, 1924-1987
46 (1)
December 1982/Detroit
47 (3)
Amiri Baraka (b. 1934)
I Am
50 (5)
In the Funk World
55 (1)
John Coltrane (1926-1967)
55 (4)
Sonia Sanchez (b. 1934)
Ballad
59 (1)
Letter to Ezekiel Mphahlele
59 (2)
Under a Soprano Sky
61 (1)
For Sweet Honey in the Rock
62 (2)
Philadelphia: Spring, 1985
64 (1)
For Sister Gwen Brooks
65 (3)
Lucille Clifton (b. 1936)
dialysis
68 (1)
donor
68 (1)
1994
69 (3)
Jayne Cortez (b. 1936)
There It Is
72 (1)
The Guitars I Used to Know
73 (3)
The Heavy Headed Dance
76 (3)
Eugene B. Redmond (b. 1937)
New York Seizures
79 (2)
11-haiku-poem for a magnificent million
81 (3)
Michael S. Harper (b. 1938)
Dear John, Dear Coltrane
84 (1)
Last Affair: Bessie's Blues Song
85 (1)
High Modes: Vision as Ritual: Confirmation
86 (3)
Askia M. Touré (b. 1938)
Summer Worlds: A Mythic Landscape
89 (2)
Aboriginal Elegy: The Once and Future Queen
91 (2)
O Lord of Light! A Mystic Sage Returns to Realms of Eternity
93 (5)
Sterling D. Plumpp (b. 1940)
Be-Bop
98 (1)
History, Hollers, and Horn
98 (2)
Ornate with Smoke
100 (6)
from Mary
106 (5)
Toi Derricotte (b. 1941)
The Minks
111 (1)
After a Reading at a Black College
112 (1)
For Black Women Who Are Afraid
112 (3)
Everett Hoagland (b. 1942)
From Ground Zero
115 (2)
How Could All That Have Happened Here?
117 (3)
Time Break
120 (6)
Haki R. Madhubuti (b. 1942)
Books as Answer
126 (1)
The B Network
127 (1)
Mothers
128 (4)
Bernice Johnson Reagon (b. 1942)
Greed
132 (4)
They Are All Falling around Me
136 (3)
Nikki Giovanni (b. 1943)
The Wrong Kitchen
139 (1)
Legacies
139 (1)
Nikki-Rosa
140 (3)
Jerry W. Ward Jr. (b. 1943)
I Have Felt the Gulf: Mississippi
143 (1)
Journey 55
143 (1)
After the Report from Iron Mountain
144 (4)
Lorenzo Thomas (b. 1944)
Dangerous Doubts
148 (1)
L'Argent
148 (1)
Back in the Day
149 (3)
Yusef Komunyakaa (b. 1947)
Songs for My Father
152 (7)
Kalamu ya Salaam (b. 1947)
Sharing is hereditary
159 (1)
The Call of the Wild
159 (3)
Directions for Understanding Modern Jazz Criticism
162 (2)
Dorothy Marie Rice (b. 1948)
Taproots
164 (1)
Ambrosia
164 (1)
Remains
165 (2)
Lamont B. Steptoe (b. 1949)
Spookism
167 (1)
Contraband
167 (1)
Coming Ashore
168 (2)
Quo Vadis Gex-Breaux (b. 1950)
Jazz Rain
170 (1)
Padded Steps/Sister Song (a litany)
171 (3)
Wisdom Is
174 (1)
Memory Waves
175 (3)
E. Ethelbert Miller (b. 1950)
Roy Campanella: January, 1958
178 (1)
Bringing Back the Draft
178 (1)
Whispers, Secrets, and Promises
178 (2)
Mona Lisa Saloy (b. 1950)
The "N" Word
180 (3)
This Poem Is for You, My Sister
183 (3)
We've Come This Far
186 (3)
Afaa Michael Weaver (b. 1951)
Thelonius
189 (1)
The Poets
190 (3)
Rita Dove (b. 1952)
Freedom Ride
193 (1)
Claudette Colvin Goes to Work
193 (2)
Rosa
195 (1)
The Enactment
195 (3)
Opal Moore (b. 1953)
Eulogy for Sister
198 (1)
The Taste of Life Going On
199 (2)
Cornelius Eady (b. 1954)
How I Got Born
201 (1)
Composite
201 (1)
Birthing
202 (5)
Carole B. Weatherford (b. 1956)
The Tan Chanteuse
207 (1)
From Birmingham to Bristol in a Boxcar
207 (1)
Queen Ijo's Blues
208 (3)
Lenard D. Moore (b. 1958)
Airport
211 (1)
Black Girl Tap Dancing
211 (3)
Sharan Strange (b. 1959)
Offering
214 (1)
Night Work
214 (2)
Hunger
216 (3)
Adisa Vera Beatty (b. 1960)
Distance
219 (1)
Memorization
219 (1)
Geography
220 (2)
Elizabeth Alexander (b. 1962)
The Josephine Baker Museum
222 (2)
At the Beach
224 (1)
Passage
225 (3)
Jabari Asim (b. 1962)
1st Lt. Vernon J. Baker: Hero on the Hill (Company C, 370th Infantry Regiment, 92nd Division)
228 (2)
Let's Just Tell It
230 (4)
Baby's Breath
234 (3)
Joel Dias-Porter (DJ Renegade) (b. 1962)
Fireflies in a jar
237 (2)
Thursday Poem
239 (1)
Subterranean Night-Colored Magus
240 (4)
Thomas Sayers Ellis (b. 1963)
Sir Nose D'VoidofFunk
244 (2)
View of the Library of Congress from Paul Laurence Dunbar High School
246 (3)
John Keene (b. 1965)
After C (3): Tayloriana
249 (1)
The Haymarket
249 (3)
Natasha Trethewey (b. 1966)
Limen
252 (1)
Bellocq's Ophelia
252 (1)
Drapery Factory, Gulfport, Mississippi, 1956
253 (3)
Major Jackson (b. 1968)
Indian Song
256 (1)
Block Party
256 (1)
To Afaa Michael S. Weaver
257 (1)
Some Kind of Crazy
257 (3)
Kevin Young (b. 1970)
Quivira City Limits
260 (1)
Everywhere Is out of Town
261 (1)
East Jesus
262 (1)
Poetic Retrospective: A Blooming in the Valley Garrett McDowell 263 (4)
Notes on the Poets 267 (16)
Acknowledgments



Rethinking Social Realism: African American Art and Literature, 1930-1953
Format Hardcover
Subject Social Science / African-American Studies
ISBN/SKU 0820325643
Author Stacy I. Morgan
Publisher Univ of Georgia Pr
Publish Date February 2004

Something All Our Own: The Grant Hill Collection of African American Art
Format Hardcover
Subject Art / History / American
ISBN/SKU 0822333066
Author Grant Hill
Publisher Duke Univ Pr
Publish Date November 2003

Review
Something All Our Own is the first publication featuring the impressive sweep of 20th-century art objects in NBA basketball star Grant Hill's collection. In addition to candid and personal introductions to Hill by those close to him, and a transcribed interview with his father, former Dallas Cowboy Calvin Hill, this beautifully illustrated book contains noteworthy art historical essays. Wardlaw contributes an update on African American collectors, collecting practices, and the state of major private and public collections of African American art that includes useful endnotes. Elizabeth Alexander centers her essay on the international heritage collage and relates it to Romare Bearden's work. Beverly Guy-Sheftall highlights the wealth of images of women in this collection, speaking specifically to the work of Elizabeth Catlett. Holdings of Bearden, Catlett, and Hughie Lee-Smith represent a strength in the Hill Collection, and works in the collection by lesser-known artists such as John Coleman and Phoebe Beasley reflect the influence of the elder artists while offering much-needed exposure for their remarkable art. Summing Up: Highly recommended. General readers; lower- and upper-division undergraduates; professionals. Copyright 2004 American Library Association.


Art, Education, and African-American Culture: Albert Barnes and the Science of Philanthropy
Format Hardcover
Subject Social Science / Anthropology / Cultural
ISBN/SKU 0765802147
Author Mary Ann Meyers
Publisher Transaction Pub
Publish Date November 2003

Review
As the international art community eagerly awaits a court decision determining whether the world-renowned Barnes Foundation's collection of masterpieces can legally be relocated, yet another book has been published about the foundation's founder and his educational experiment. Meyers (secretary and director, American Academy of Political and Social Science) concentrates her study on the irascible, brilliant, and innovative Barnes (1872-1951) and his spirit of emergent liberalism, which spurred him to give the African American Lincoln University the honor and responsibility of nominating four of the five Barnes Foundation trustees. Extensively researched, end-noted, and archive-based, this book links Barnes's passion for art to his early life experiences in a poor section of Philadelphia, his inspiration by African American religious culture, his educational background in medicine, and his invention and production of a widely used antiseptic. It traces Barnes's repeatedly failed attempts at securing mutually beneficial, autonomous, and lasting liaisons with educational and cultural institutions in the Philadelphia area and elsewhere. This often entertaining, sometimes shocking, yet quite scholarly analysis is highly recommended for most academic libraries and those large public library collections that emphasize art, education, and African American culture.-Cheryl Ann Lajos, Free Lib. of Philadelphia Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.


African Americans in the Visual Arts
Format Hardcover
Subject Biography & Autobiography / People Of Color
ISBN/SKU 0816048800
Author Steven Otfinoski
Publisher Facts on File
Publish Date October 2003

Annotation
Offers alphabetically arranged profiles of nearly two hundred African Americans who have made significant contributions to the visual arts, including painters, sculptors, illustrators, filmmakers, and photographers.


Review
Part of a ten-volume set profiling African Americans in various fields, this reference contains information about 192 African-American painters, sculptors, ceramists, illustrators, cartoonists, photographers, filmmakers, and architects who made important contributions to the fine arts during the 19th and 20th centuries. Each entry summarizes the artist's biographical information, educational background, sources of influence and inspiration, and major works created. Fifty black-and-white photographs are provided. Annotation (c) Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

African-American Masters: Highlights from the Smithsonian American Art Museum
Format Hardcover
Subject Art / History / American
ISBN/SKU 0810945118
Author Gwen Everett
Publisher Harry N Abrams Inc
Publish Date March 2003

Annotation
Written to accompany the exhibition of the same name, this colorful tour of the art of the Harlem Renaissance and beyond features a host of surprises, including Roy DeCarava's photograph "Graduation," work by the sculptor Augusta Savage, and a famous 1966 photograph of Muhammad Ali. 15,000 first printing.


Review
Admirably designed and thoughtfully curated, this slim catalogue of 52 art reproductions accompanies the Smithsonian's eponymous exhibition of 20th century black artists, which will tour the country through 2005. Encompassing photographs, paintings and sculptures, the catalogue presents some of the most accomplished works in the museum's collection, from James VanDerZee's dignified portraits of middle class men and women in 1920s and '30s Harlem to Earlie Hudnall's striking 1991 photograph of a young boy boldly staring into the camera. In Roy DeCarava's 1949 image Graduation, New York (from The sweet Flypaper of life, a book he published with Langston Hughes), a girl in a spotless white gown glides through a desolate landscape of urban decay. In his brightly colored paintings, William Johnson celebrates the dynamism of Harlem and looks back at his childhood in rural South Carolina. Joseph Delaney brings to life the vibrant crowd scene of Penn Station with a WWII era painting. Each work is complemented by illuminating commentaries written by Everett (Rising Above Jim Crow: The Printings of Johnnie Lee Gray), an adjunct art history professor at Howard University and the Corcoran College of Art and Design. Reflecting African and European, folk and modernist influences, the art reproduced here is a vital part of American cultural heritage. Full-color and b&w illustrations. (Sept.) Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information.


African-American Artists, 1929-1945: Prints, Drawings, and Paintings in the Metropolitan Museum of Art
Format Paperback
Subject Art / General
ISBN/SKU 0300098774
Author Metropolitan Museum of Art (New York, N.Y.) (Cor)
Publisher Yale Univ Pr
Publish Date February 2003

Review
This catalog reproduces a small portion of the Metropolitan Museum of Art's African American holdings. Since 1942, the collection has quietly grown to more than 500 works representing the diversity of an often-overlooked faction of American artists. The exhibition included several of the 204 prints donated by Reba Williams and Dave Williams in 1999. As a consequence, prints dominate the catalog and are supported by Rachel Mustalish's useful historical overview of printmaking practices. The chronology of the exhibition covered the most active early years of African American visual art production. Artists like Jacob Lawrence and James Wells were heirs to the enlightened New Negro Arts movement, which came to a close around 1929. Thereafter, a steadily growing number of artists came into their own under the auspices of federally funded New Deal programs that lasted until the end of WW II. Messinger's introduction offers an overview of the Museum's collecting practices during those years and revisits earlier exhibitions devoted to African American art. The 47 works featured in the catalog, individually described by art historian Collins, are set within categories like portraiture and recreation. ^BSumming Up: Highly recommended. General readers; lower- and upper-division undergraduates. Copyright 2003 American Library Association


Traditional African American Arts and Activities
Format Paperback
Subject Juvenile Nonfiction / Ethnic / African-American
ISBN/SKU 0471410462
Author Sonya Kimble-Ellis
Publisher John Wiley & Sons Inc
Publish Date December 2001

Annotation
A collection of activities focusing on cultural traditions related to African American history, including celebrations like Kwanzaa and Juneteenth, activities such as storytelling and hair braiding, and games such as Mancala.


Review
Gr 3-7-This title explores the rich and diverse cultural history of African Americans. Through activities, quotes, brief historical notes, and a glossary, a wide variety of information is presented. Projects are grouped under chapters that discuss "Celebrations," "Traditions," "Crafts," "Games," "Culture," and "Soul Food and Caribbean Cuisine." Each activity begins with an explanation of its historical and cultural significance to Africans and/or African Americans. Clear instructions are presented in a "Here's What You Need," "Here's What You Do" format. The simple line drawings of figures with exaggerated and elongated features are not particularly attractive but help illustrate and clarify the projects.-Genevieve Gallagher, New York Public Library Copyright 2002 Cahners Business Information.


Souls Grown Deep: African-American Vernacular Art of the South
Format Hardcover
Subject Art / Collections, Catalogs, Exhibitions
ISBN/SKU 096537663X
Author William Arnett
Publisher Pub Group West
Publish Date October 2001

Children of Promise: African-American Literature and Art for Young People
Format Hardcover
Subject Juvenile Fiction / Ethnic / African American
ISBN/SKU 0810982218
Author Charles Sullivan (EDT)
Publisher Abradale/Abrams
Publish Date September 2001

Annotation
Poems, prose, photographs, and paintings explore the African-American experience as seen through art and literature by blacks or about black subjects.

Testimony: Vernacular Art of the African-American South : The Ronald and June Shelp Collection
Format Hardcover
Subject Art / History / American
ISBN/SKU 0810944847
Author Kinshasha Conwill (EDT)
Publisher Harry N Abrams Inc
Publish Date August 2001

Annotation
Complemented by more than 170 superlative illustrations and reproductions, this vivid look at African-American vernacular art celebrates the work of twenty-seven self-taught artists whose artistry captures the social, cultural, and spiritual experiences of African Americans in America's South.


Review
Published in conjunction with the exhibitions beginning in September 2000 organized by The Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture and Exhibitions International, this volume presents a collection of contemporary work as testimony to the continuing struggle for social justice, cultural identity, and spiritual and personal fulfillment experienced by Southern African Americans. It contains about 100 color paintings, drawings, and sculptures by 27 self-taught black artists. The six themes comprise witnessing history; the representation of allegorical animals, iconic figures, and religious scenes; spiritual and protective messages; and the direct observation of daily life. Essays by distinguished scholars offer critical viewpoints on current issues. Short biographies of the artists, accompanied by their own words, are interwoven with the illustrations. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

Words With Wings: A Treasury of African-American Poetry and Art
Format Hardcover
Subject Juvenile Nonfiction / Poetry / General
ISBN/SKU 0688164153
Author Belinda Rochelle (EDT)
Publisher Harpercollins Childrens Books
Publish Date January 2001

Annotation
A stunning collection pairs twenty poems by distinguished African-American poets with twenty works of art by acclaimed African-American artists, including names such as Maya Angelou, Langston Hughes, and Jacob Lawrence.


Review
Gr. 4-up. In her eloquent introduction to this large-size anthology, Rochelle says that art lets us "look at private moments without interrupting them." Her great selections do just that. Each of the 20 poems is opposite a painting reproduced in splendid color. All are by well-known writers and artists, both classic and contemporary. The poets range from Langston Hughes and Countee Cullen to Alice Walker, and the artists include Elizabeth Catlett, Romare Bearden, and more. The art doesn't overwhelm the words because there's no attempt to make a literal connection. Nikki Giovanni's heartbreaking "Legacies" is opposite Horace Pippin's Saying Prayers; both show that a grandparent and child cannot express their love, "and I guess nobody ever does." Lucille Clifton's poem "Auction Street" is opposite Jacob Lawrence's painting Community. At the back of the book are short notes on each poet and artist. For children and older readers, this is a stirring book that will take them up close to private moments and also extend their view of themselves. --Hazel Rochman Copyright 2000 Booklist Reviews


Clarence Major and His Art: Portraits of an African American Postmodernist
Format Paperback
Subject Art / Painting
ISBN/SKU 0807848999
Author Bernard W. Bell (EDT)
Publisher Univ of North Carolina Pr
Publish Date January 2001

Annotation
Offers a collection of Clarence Major's poetry, fiction, and art, providing critical interpretations alongside each selection.


The Walter O. Evans Collection of African American Art
Format Hardcover
Subject Art / Fine Arts
ISBN/SKU 0295979208
Author Andrea D. Barnwell
Publisher Univ of Washington Pr
Publish Date June 2000

Review
Over 20 years, Dr. Walter Evans assembled a most impressive collection of art works by African American artists. This catalog to the traveling exhibition of a major portion of the collection provides a visual survey of significant artists from the mid-19th to the late 20th centuries. (The international exhibition will be seen in this country at New York's Metropolitan Museum of Art.) More than 80 color plates show works arranged alphabetically by artist's name, followed by a section of succinct, well-researched artists' biographies. Preceding the plates are six essays related to the collection and the development of African American art. Tritobia Benjamin's introduction; the foreword by Barnwell, a MacArthur Fellow at the Art Institute of Chicago; and Evans's own "Reflections on Collecting" address the significance of the collection and how it came to be; three other scholarly essays focus on specific artists and their roles in art history. While not a textbook survey, this catalog documents an important aspect of American art in a broad and inclusive manner, and it is highly recommended for any library interested in art or African American studies. Eugene C. Burt, Seattle Copyright 2000 Cahners Business Information.


Navigators: African American Musicians, Dancers and Visual Artists in Academe
Format Hardcover
Subject Social Science / African-American Studies
ISBN/SKU 0791443531
Author Terry Jenoure
Publisher State Univ of New York Pr
Publish Date November 1999

Review
Jenoure (Fine Arts Center, U. of Massachusetts-Amherst) presents the stories of 12 African American artists who teach music, dance, and visual arts at colleges and universities that have traditionally been viewed as White institutions. They discuss the various paths and gateways that led them to become artists and teachers, and how they became politically and socially aware. She explores their visions and callings, how they function in higher education, and the lessons their experiences offer about developing and sustaining creativity. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

Library of African American Arts and Culture
Format Library
Subject
ISBN/SKU 0823997855
Author
Publisher Rosen Pub Group
Publish Date September 1999

African Americans in Art: Selections from the Art Institute of Chicago
Format Paperback
Subject Art / History / American
ISBN/SKU 0295978333
Author Susan F.N L. Rossen (EDT)
Publisher Univ of Washington Pr
Publish Date May 1999

Review
Highlights African American artists represented at The Art Institute of Chicago. Provides an overview of concerns surrounding race in art, celebrates the achievements of a number of artists, and provides a multifaceted view of American art and culture, with four essays and a stunning portfolio of 29 images illustrated in color, with brief entries examining individual works. Distributed by the University of Washington Press. Lacks a subject index. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)


African American Art: The Long Struggle
Format Hardcover
Subject Art / History / African
ISBN/SKU 1880908727
Author Crystal A. Britton
Publisher New Line Books
Publish Date September 1998

Annotation
Offers an illustrated survey of African American art from its beginnings in the era of slavery to the paintings, sculpture, and prints of the late twentieth-century.

African-American Art
Format Paperback
Subject Art / History / General
ISBN/SKU 0192842137
Author Sharon Patton
Publisher Oxford Univ Pr

Annotation
Discusses African American folk art, decorative art, photography, and fine arts

A Drawing in the Sand: The Story of African American Art
Format Hardcover
Subject Juvenile Nonfiction / Biography & Autobiography / Art
ISBN/SKU 1559332166
Author Jerry Butler
Publisher Zino Pr Childrens Books
Publish Date January 1998

Annotation
Describes Jerry Butler's development as an artist and his discovery of the long and beautiful tradition of Afro-American art that preceded him


Review
/*Starred Review*/ Gr. 4^-7. Eclectic in concept, this large-format book intertwines two separate but related strands: the history of African American artists and the personal story of Jerry Butler's life and education as an artist. Often the two texts run in parallel columns on the same page, visually differentiated by their typeface and colored backgrounds. Butler's family photos, collages, and paintings appear along with photographs of artwork by others, such as Henry Tanner, Augusta Savage, Jacob Lawrence, and Faith Ringgold. Although readers may find the concept a little bewildering at first, those who stick with it will be rewarded twice, increasingly involved in Butler's personal narrative and better informed about the lives and work of great African American artists working in many styles and materials. Butler, who now teaches art at the University of Wisconsin at Madison, begins his personal history with his strong family roots in Mississippi, and though he has traveled north and explored the whole range of art history, he continues to draw strength and inspiration from his childhood and young-adult experiences. His own discovery of African American art becomes an eye-opening journey of discovery for readers as well. An original and personal introduction to the field. ((Reviewed February 15, 1999)) Copyright 2000 Booklist Reviews


Flash of the Spirit: African and Afro-American Art and Philosophy
Format Paperback
Edition VINTAGE
Subject Art / Popular Culture
ISBN/SKU 0394723694
Author Robert Farris Thompson
Publisher Random House Inc
Publish Date August 1984

Annotation
A revisionist account of the origins of Tango looks to African influences in Argentina while painting a colorful portrait of the evolution of this great dance form. 12,500 first printing.

The Art of Romare Bearden
Format Hardcover
Subject Art / Individual Artist
ISBN/SKU 0810946408
Author Romare Bearden
Publisher Harry N Abrams Inc
Publish Date September 2003

Annotation
One of the nation's most unique artistic voices finds expression in this fascinating retrospective of his work, illuminating his groundbreaking work in collages, photastats, watercolors, gouaches, and oils, including examples of his lesser-known landscape painting, sculpture, costume designs, and much, much more. 17,500 first printing.


Review
Romare Bearden (1911-1988) was an American artist who came of age in Harlem during the Harlem Renaissance period. His work is infused with the rhythms of jazz and the blues, the mystery of popular religion, and echoes of European old masters and African art. Fine, curator and head of the Department of Special Projects in Modern Art at the National Gallery of Art, presents many examples of his collages, photostats, and watercolors, as well as his paintings, murals, book illustrations, and costume designs. Much of the art has been culled from private collections and is rarely seen. Fine's essay on the artist's life and work is accompanied by shorter essays on his European and African sources, plus Bearden's own writings and contemporary criticism of his art. The book is illustrated with color and b&w art reproductions. Annotation ©2004 Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

Me and Uncle Romie: A Story Inspired by the Life and Art of Romare Bearden
Format School and Library
Subject Juvenile Fiction / Ethnic / African American
ISBN/SKU 0803725205
Author Claire Hartfield
Publisher Penguin USA
Publish Date December 2002

Annotation
James, a boy from North Carolina, spends the summer in New York City visiting the neighborhood of Harlem where his uncle, collage artist Romare Bearden, grew up.


Review
K-Gr. 3. The work of the landmark Harlem Renaissance painter Romare Bearden is the story behind the story in this handsome picture book that shows how he used paint and collage to create his amazing art. Told as fiction through the eyes of Bearden's young nephew James, who is visiting New York City from North Carolina, the words and pictures express what James sees and feels in the exciting neighborhood streets, what he remembers of home, and how the storytelling scraps relate to Bearden's art. Lagarrigue, who illustrated Nikki Grimes' My Man Blue (1999), once again uses expressive paintings to capture the "beat and bounce" of the city and the powerful bond between a boy and a loving father figure. This would be a stimulating model for art classes, and Hartfield ends with a useful double-page spread encouraging students to create their own storytelling combinations. The collage elements in Lagarrigue's vibrant acrylic pictures are less prominent than in Bearden's own work, but they add depth and rhythm to the beautiful painterly narrative that will introduce many children to the famous artist's life and work. ((Reviewed February 15, 2003)) Copyright 2003 Booklist Reviews


Life with Margaret The Autobiography of Dr Margaret Burroughs
Format Hardcover
Subject Biography & Autobiography / General
ISBN/SKU 0971579768
Author Sterling Stuckey
Publisher In Time Pub & Media Group
Publish Date August 2003

Betye Saar 2006 Calendar
Format Paperback
Edition WALL
Subject Non-Classifiable
ISBN/SKU 0764931725
Author N
Publisher Pomegranate
Publish Date June 2005

Afro-American Artists: New York and Boston: The Museum of the
National Center of Afro-American Artists, the Museum of Fine
Arts [and] the School of the Museum of five Arts, Boston, 19
May - 23 June, 1970. Boston: Boston Book and Art Publishers,
1970. Exhibition catalog.


Amistad II: A Bicentennial Celebration for All, Inspired by the
Struggle of a Few. N.p., United Church Press, 1975.


Amistad II is a traveling exhibition of works of art
created between 1790 and 1975 by African-American
artists.

The Barnett-Aden Collection. Washington, DC: Published for the
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum by the Smithsonian Institution
Press; for sale by the Supt. of Docs., U.S. Govt. Print. Off.,
1974. Collection catalog.

AUZENNE, VALLIERE RICHARD, intro. The Catalogue of the Barnett-Aden Collection. 144 pp., 60 full-page color plates, 13 b&w illus., notes, bibliog., inventory list of 120 works by African American artists, plus a small collection of African art.


Bearden, Romare. The Art of Romare Bearden: The Prevalence of
Ritual. Text by M. Bunch Washington. New York: Abrams,
1973.


Black Dimensions in Art, Inc. Black Artists in Historical Perspective:
Schenectady Museum, Schenectady, NY, February 14 through April
4, Albany Institute of History and Art, Albany, NY, May 1 through
May 31. N.p.: Black Dimensions in Art, 1976. Exhibition
catalog.


Chase, Judith Wragg. Afro-American Art and Craft. New York: Van
Nostrand Reinhold Co., 1971.


District of Columbia Art Association. Exhibition 1974-75: November 17,
1974 to January 29, 1975 at the Anacostia Neighborhood
Museum-Smithsonian Institution. Smithsonian Institution Press
Publication No. 5331. Washington, DC: Smithsonian Institution
Press; for sale by the Supt. of Docs., U.S. Govt. Print. Off.,
1974.


Doty, Robert M. Contemporary Black Artists in America. New York:
Whitney Museum of American Art, 1971.


Dover, Cedric. American Negro Art. Greenwich, CT: Graphic Society,
1960.


Driskell, David C. Two Centuries of Black American Art: Los Angeles
County Museum of Art, Atlanta, Museum of Fine Arts, Dallas, the
Brooklyn Museum. Catalog notes by Leonard Simon. Los
Angeles: Los Angeles County Museum of Art, 1976. Exhibition
catalog.


Harlem Cultural Council. New Black Artists: An Exhibition Organized
by the Harlem Cultural Council, in Cooperation with the School of
the Arts, and the Urban Center of Columbia University. Brooklyn
Museum, Oct. 7 to Nov. 9, 1969: Columbia University, Nov. 20 to
Dec. 12, 1969. New York: Printed by Clarke & Way, 1969.


Hartigan, Lynda Roscoe. Sharing Traditions: Five Black Artists in
Nineteenth-Century America: From the Collections of the
National Museum of American Art. Washington, DC: Published
for the Museum by the Smithsonian Institution Press, 1985.


Published on the occasion of an exhibition at the National Museum of
American Art, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC, January
15-April 7, 1985.

Herbert F. Johnson Museum of Art. Directions in Afro-American Art:
September 18 through October 27, 1974. Ithaca, NY: Office of
University Publications, Cornell University, 1974. Exhibition
catalog.


Cosponsored by the Africana Studies and Research
Center, Cornell University.
Lawrence, Jacob. Jacob Lawrence. Text by Milton W. Brown, with the
assistance of Louise A. Parks. New York: Whitney Museum of
American Art, 1974.


Compiled for the Jacob Lawrence exhibition held at the
Whitney Museum of American Art, May, 1974.
The Legend of John Brown. Detroit: Detroit Institute of Arts, 1978.
Printed on the occasion of the exhibition of Jacob
Lawrence's John Brown series at the Detroit Institute of
Arts, October 14 - November 26, 1978. Includes a poem,
"John Brown," by Robert Earl Hayden.


Locke, Alain LeRoy, ed. The Negro in Art: A Pictorial Record of the
Negro Artist and of the Negro Theme in Art. Washington, DC:
Associates in Negro Folk Education, 1940.


New York (State) Division of the Humanities and the Arts. Fifteen
under Forty: Paintings by Young New York State Black Artists,
Gallery Museum, Hall of Springs, Saratoga Performing Arts Center,
July 1st through July 31, 1970. Albany, NY, 1970.


Perry, Regenia A. Selections of Nineteenth-Century Afro-American Art:
Catalogue. New York: Metropolitan Museum of Art, 1976.
Exhibition catalog.


Rodman, Selden. Horace Pippin, a Negro Painter in America. New
York: Quadrangle Press, 1947.


Roelof-Lanner T.V., ed. Prints by American Negro Artists. Los
Angeles: Cultural Exchange Center, 1965.


Sommer, Robert. Street Art. New York: Links, 1975.


White, Charles. Images of Dignity: The Drawings of Charles White.
Edited by Benjamin Horowitz. Los Angeles: W. Ritchie Press,
1967.


Willis-Thomas, Deborah. Black Photographers, 1840-1940: An
Illustrated Bio-bibliography. Garland Reference Library of the
Humanities, vol. 40. New York: Garland, 1985.


_____. An Illustrated Bio-bibliography of Black Photographers,
1940-1988. New York: Garland, 1989.


Wilson, James L. Clementine Hunter, American Folk Artist. Gretna:
Pelican Publishing Co., 1988.

Albany Institute of History and Art, Albany. Negro Artist Comes of
Age: A National Survey of Contemporary American Artists.
Albany Institute of History and Art, January 3rd through February
11th, 1945. Albany, NY: 1945.


Cederholm, Theresa Dickason, comp. Afro-American Artists: A
Bio-bibliographical Directory. Boston: Trustees of the Boston
Public Library, 1973.


Contemporary Visual Expressions: The Art of Sam Gilliam, Martha
Jackson-Jarvis, Keith Morrison, William T. Williams. Washington,
DC: Anacostia Museum, Smithsonian Institution, 1987.
Pamphlet.


Fax, Elton C. Black Artists of the New Generation. Foreword by
Romare Bearden. New York: Dodd, Mead, 1977.


_____. Seventeen Black Artists. New York: Dodd, Mead, 1971. (Z,
709.2, F281).
Lewis, Samella S., and Ruth G. Waddy. Black Artists on Art. Los
Angeles: Contemporary Crafts Publishers, 1969-71.


Livingston, Jane, and John Beardsley. Black Folk Art in America,
1930-1980. Jackson, MS: Published for the Corcoran Gallery of
Art by the University Press of Mississippi; Center for the Study
of Southern Culture, 1982.


Moutoussamy-Ashe, Jeanne. Viewfinders: Black Women Photographers.
New York: Dodd, Mead, 1986.


Parks, Gordon. To Smile in Autumn: A Memoir. New York: Norton,
1979.


Rollock, Barbara. Black Authors and Illustrators of Children's Books:
A Biographical Dictionary. Garland Reference Library of the
Humanities, vol. 660. New York: Garland, 1988.

Bearden, Romare. Painter's Mind: A Study of the Relations of Structure
and Space in Painting. New York: Crown Publishers, 1969.


Biggers, John Thomas, Carroll Simms, and John Edward Weems.
Black Art in Houston: The Texas Southern University Experience.
College Station, TX: Texas A & M University Press, 1978.


Diskell, David C., ed. Amistad II, Afro-American Art. Nashville: Dept.
of Art, Fisk University, 1975.


Fine, Elsa Honig. The Afro-American Artist: A Search for Identity.
New York: Holt, Rinehart and Winston, 1973.


Gayle, Addison, comp. The Black Aesthetic. Garden City, NY:
Doubleday, 1971.


Goode-Bryant, Linda, and Marcy S. Philips. Contextures. New York:
Just Above Midtown, 1978.


Harlem Renaissance: Art of Black America. Introduction by Mary
Schmidt Campbell. Essays by David Driskell, David Levering
Lewis, and Deborah Willis Ryan. New York: The Studio
Museum in Harlem, Harry N. Abrams, 1987.


Harmon Foundation, Inc. Negro Artists: An Illustrated Review of Their
Achievements, Including Exhibition of Paintings by the Late
Malvin Gray Johnson and Sculptures by Richmond Barthe and
Sargent Johnson. Presented by the Harmon Foundation in
cooperation with the Delphic Studios, April 22 - May 4, 1935,
inclusive. Freeport, NY: Books for Libraries, 1971.


Newton, James E., and Ronald L. Lewis, eds. The Other Slaves:
Mechanics, Artisans, and Craftsmen. Boston: G.K. Hall, 1978.


There are several chapters on African-American artists.
Porter, James Amos. Modern Negro Art. New York: Dryden, 1943.


Reno, Dawn E. Collecting Black Americana. New York: Crown
Publishing, 1986.


Wheat, Ellen Harkins. Jacob Lawrence, American Painter. Seattle:
University of Washington Press in association with the Seattle
Art Museum, 1986. Exhibition catalog.

Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project. Subject to Index to Literature
on Negro Art. Chicago: Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project,
1941.


Davis, Lenwood G., and Janet Sims. Black Artists in the United States:
An Annotated Bibliography of Books, Articles, and Dissertations
on Black Artists, 1779-1979. Westport, CT: Greenwood, 1980.


Igoe, Lynn Moody, and James Igoe. 250 Years of Afro-American Art:
An Annotated Bibliography. New York: Bowker, 1981.


Williams, Ora. American Black Women in the Arts and Social Sciences:
A Bibliographic Survey. Rev. and expanded ed. Metuchen, NJ:
Scarecrow, 1978.
Visual artists are included, pp. 96-102.

Gumbo Ya Ya: Anthology of Contemporary African American Women Artists. New York: Midmarch Arts Press, 1995.

St. James Guide to Black Artists. Detroit, MI: St. James Press, 1997.

JOURNAL: International Review of African American Art.

JOURNAL: Revue Noire.

JOURNAL: Black Renaissance=Renaissance Noire

Guy C. McElroy, Richard J. Powell, and Sharon F. Patton, African American Artists 1880-1987, (Washington, D.C.: Smitsonian Institution) 1989.

Richard S. Powell, Black Art and Culture in the 20th Century, (New York: Thames and Hudson, Inc.) 1997.

Irving Sandler, American Art of the 1960s, (New York: Harper & Row Publishers) 1988.

Black Art--Ancestral Legacy: The African Impulse in African-American Art, (New York: Harry N. Abrams, Inc.) 1989.


Chester M. Hedgepeth, Jr., ed., 20th Century American Writers and Artists, (Chicago: American Library Association), 1991.


Lynn Moody Igoe, ed., 250 Years of Afro-American Art, (New York: R.R. Bowker Co.) 1981.


Herbert F. Johnson, Directions in Afro-American Art, (New York: Herbert F. Johnson Museum of Art, Cornell University) 1974.


Dennis Thomison, The Black Artist in America: An Index to Reproductions, (Metuchen, N.J.: Scarecrow Press, Inc.) 1991.

Melvin Dixon, "White Critic - Black Art??," Black Art Notes, ed. Tom Lloyd (Black Art Notes) 1971.


Hilton Kramer, "Black Art and Expedient Politics," The New York Times June 7, 1970.


Sharon Patton, African American Art, (New York: Oxford UP) 1998.


Raymond Saunders, Black is a Color, 1967, African American Art, (New York: Oxford UP) 1998.

Against the Odds: African-American Artists and the Harmon Foundation- An exhibition catalog of artistic works gathered by the Newark Museum for a traveling show, this book expands on the usual catalogue raisonne with lengthy introductory chapters on Afro American art history. Each artist in the exhibition is given a page-length biography with an illustrative photograph attached. Appendices include a list of Harmon Foundation exhibition records, a selected bibliography, and a name and subject index.

Against the Odds: African-American Artists and the Harmon Foundation - An exhibition catalog of artistic works gathered by the Newark Museum for a traveling show, this book expands on the usual catalogue raisonne with lengthy introductory chapters on Afro American art history. Each artist in the exhibition is given a page-length biography with an illustrative photograph attached. Appendices include a list of Harmon Foundation exhibition records, a selected bibliography, and a name and subject index.

Benjamin, Tritobia H. The World of Loïs Mailou Jones. Washington, D.C.: Meridian House International, 1990.

Bier, Justus. "Ellis Wilson: Kentucky Negro Artist." The Courier-Journal Magazine (April 30, 1950): 36-37.

Cohn, Terri. "Raymond Saunders-Malcolm X: Talking Pictures at Stephen Wirtz Gallery." Artweek 25 (Oct. 20, 1994): 17.

Hooks, Bell. Art on My Mind: Visual Politics

Dover, Cedric. American Negro Art. A heavily illustrated survey from the colonial period to the 20th century. Artist and general index, selected portraits of artists, and bibliography. An important contribution following in the footsteps of Locke and Porter.

Porter, James A. Modern Negro Art. By the first African-American art historian, the "father of Black art history," this is the classic work on the subject, the "first to denote and define the African impulse in the visual arts in the U.S." Porter also arranged the first exhibition of contemporary African art in the U.S. (1951, Howard University). David Driskell's introduction to the 1992 edition is an important review of the development of African-American art history.

Locke, Alain. Negro Art: Past and Present. Locke was the "first major advocate, critic, patron, and writer on Afro-American art." His landmark work surveys the linkages of African-American art to the legacy of African art. For an excellent bibliography of Locke's publications see Note 18, p. 25 in Against the Odds listed on p. 4 of this bibliography.

Du Bois, W.E.B. The Negro American Artisan. Du Bois' huge body of work includes this important title, probably the first survey of African-American art. (See also the W.E.B. Du Bois WWW site in Internet Resources.)

African-American Mosaic: a Library of Congress Resource Guide for the Study of Black History and Culture. E184.6.L47 1993 Main Library Reference. An essential recent publication; see also the WWW Page listed under Internet Resources.

Dictionnaire Black. An A-Z dictionary of popular culture, which includes short entries for African-American topics or persons, with occasional short bibliographies. Interesting for its French perspective.

Encyclopedia of African-American Culture and History. This major 5-volume work includes entries on art collections in vol. 1, painting and sculpture in vol. 4, and many cross-references and biographies of figures such as James A. Porter.

Encyclopedia of World Art. The entry in Volume 1, "Afro-American Art" is dated but useful for its map of the diffusion and origins of Afro-American art.

Cederholm. Afro-American Artists: a Bio-Bibliographical Directory. The first major biographical dictionary of African-American artists, covering the colonial period to 1973. Includes exhibition catalogs; reviews; periodicals, including newspapers; and books. The A-Z entries include brief biographical information, lists of works and exhibitions, collections and reference sources for each artist. An essential work.

Thomison. The Black Artist in America: an Index to Reproductions. Listing Black artists from the colonial period to the present, this source is useful as a biographical work; it cites reproductions that have appeared in books, periodicals and catalogs through 1990, including most media as well as folk art. Selective subject index, bibliography, list of institutions, audiovisual materials and exhibition catalogs.

African-American Architects in Current Practice. Profiles 31 practicing architects, with a chronology of African-American architects 1868-1991, a map of the 810 practicing architects in the U.S., a list of organizations and short essays on the African-American architectural experience in America.

Afro-American Folk Art and Crafts. Covers quilters, sculptors, instrument-makers, basketmakers, builders, blacksmiths and potters from the colonial period. A lengthy bibliography, subject guide, filmography, and important essays such as Robert Farris Thompson's 1969 essay on African influences.

Black Artists on Art. This 2-volume work by Samella Lewis is an illustrated survey of several hundred contemporary (1969) African-American artists and Black artists working in the U.S. Includes artists' statements and brief biographical entries at the end of the volumes.

Black Photographers, 1840-1940: an Illustrated Bio-Bibliography. and An Illustrated Bio-Bibliography of Black Photographers, 1940-1988. Deborah Willis-Thomas' groundbreaking companion volumes are heavily illustrated, with excellent bibliographies and exhibition chronologies. Short biographical entries include exhibitions and collections in which works are included, as well as a selected bibliography.

Directory of People of Color in the Visual Arts. 759 artists, art historians, critics and arts administrators are listed, with indexes by state, ethnicity and discipline.

Folk Artists Biographical Index. Ethnicity is indicated in the artist entries; since a large proportion of folk artists are African-American this is an important source.

Free Within Ourselves: African-American Artists in the Collection of the National Museum of American Art. While not a biographical work per se, this serves as a reference work, a cross-section of 31 artists from one of the largest and most comprehensive collections of African-American art (including the work of self-taught artists) from the colonial to contemporary period. Many illustrations, excellent bibliography of archival resources, books, exhibition catalogs, and articles

Museum of American Folk Art Encyclopedia of Twentieth-Century American Folk Art and Artists. Black artists comprise a significant percentage of the total number of folk artists, and the Museum has held numerous exhibitions of African-American artists. An A-Z listing, with biographical information, exhibition lists, bibliography, list of public collections, and an index interspersed with photos of some of the 255 artists listed.

Twentieth-Century African-American Writers and Artists. An A-Z work which includes about 80 "prominent" painters and sculptors (i.e. who have exhibited in major museums.). Summary of artist's life, short critical note, exhibition and collections list and selected bibliography.

20th Century American Folk, Self-taught, and Outsider Art. Guide to the artists, organizations, publishers,museums, and listing by state. Bibliography of books, exhibition catalogs and articles. NB: Excludes decoys, quilts and pottery.

Davis. Black Artists in the United States: an Annotated Bibliography of Books, Articles, and Dissertations on Black Artists, The annotated entries also include general periodicals such as Ebony, Encore, The Messenger, Afro-American Woman's Journal, etc. Includes an index.

Design and Applied Arts Index. Index Shelves. Use heading Black Designers and its cross-references.

Holmes. The Complete Annotated Resource Guide to Black American Art: Books, Doctoral Dissertations, Exhibition Catalogs, Periodicals, Films, Slides, Large Prints, Speakers, Filmstrips, Video Tapes, Black Museums, Art alleries... Comprehensive but dated; useful for the many citations of exhibitions without catalogs, but only ephemeral checklists, etc. (list by organization). Also a helpful chronology from 1875 to 1980, of books, films, exhibitions, etc.

Karpel. Arts in America: a Bibliography. The major, though dated, bibliography for American art. Includes bibliographies, collections and exhibition catalogs, a list of serials and periodicals, index by medium, etc. Uses term Blacks, with numerous sub-headings. (Also uses Afro-Americans but fewer citations under that heading. See the Index volume (4).

Staats. African Americans and the Visual Arts: a Resource Guide to Books, Articles, and Dissertations, 1900-1990. . A basic, un-annotated, bibliography from a wide range of sources.

African-American Artists, 1880-1987: Selections from the Evans-Tibbs Collection. One of the premier collections and archives of African-American artists' work in the U.S., the Evans-Tibbs Collection is located in Washington, DC.

Africobra: the First Twenty Years. Africobra was a political movement with a black ideology founded in the 1960s.

Afro-American Collection, Fisk University. The collections at Fisk, including many African objects brought back by missionaries, were begun in the 19th century. The Harmon Foundation gave Fisk approximately 400 works of art in 1968. David Driskell, a former director, provides an essay in this catalog of 63 artists. Selected bibliography.

Against the Odds: African-American Artists and the Harmon Foundation. The Foundation provided support to African-American artists beginning in the '30s. In the late '60s, its collections were dispersed among Fisk and Hampton Universities, the National Museum of American Art, and the National Portrait Gallery. This catalog includes an essay on early exhibitions of African-American art, and the Foundation's early activities. Biographical entries on the artists, and the exhibition record of the Foundation.

Baking in the Sun: Visionary Images from the South: Selections from the Collection of Sylvia Warren Lowe. This catalog includes 16 'outsider' artists, both Black and White, 180 works of art; and a chapter on Africanisms in Afro-American visionary art.

Barnett-Aden Collection. Founded in 1943 by James V. Herring and Alonzo J. Aden of Howard University, this gallery welcomed artists of every race. The catalog of this rich collection includes a brief survey of African-American art of the 19th and 20th centuries, and is heavily illustrated (120 ills.); biographies of the artists.

Black Art Ancestral Legacy: the African Impulse in African-American Art. An essential work, a major exhibition catalog with scholarly essays. Forty-nine artists are represented, with substantial biographical entries and photos of the artists.

Black Folk Art in America, 1930-1980. Another major exhibition.

Black History and Artistry: Work by Self-Taught Painters from the Blanchard-Hill Collection.

Blues Aesthetic: Black Culture and Modernism.

Caribbean Festival Arts.

Exhibition of African Negro Art [Howard University, 1953]. Curated by James V. Herring, who founded the Art Department at Howard, the first such program in a predominantly black institution of higher learning; in the '30s, Howard was the center for African-American art.

Exhibition of Productions by Negro Artists [Harmon Foundation]. Permanent Reserve II.

Faces of the Gods: Art and Altars of Africa and the African Americas. An essential exhibition catalog by Robert Farris Thompson.

Harmon and Harriet Kelley Collection of African American Art. A fine private collection assembled in just the space of a decade. Includes both trained and folk artists, 124 pieces/70 artists in this exhibition.

Hidden Heritage: Afro-American Art, 1800-1950.An exhibition curated by David Driskell to include artists not in the 1976 "Two Centuries" exhibition.

Negro Artists: an Illustrated Review of Their Achievements. Permanent Reserve II. Another exhibition of the Harmon Foundation.

Next Generation: Southern Black Aesthetic. An exhibition at the Southeastern Center for Contemporary Art in Winston-Salem, NC, which often features African-American artists.

Two Centuries of Black American Art. A landmark exhibition, the largest of its type at the time, of 63 artists from numerous public and private collections. Curated by David Driskell.

United American Healthcare Corporation Collection. Established in 1992, this Detroit collection includes 20th century works by African-American artists; the catalog features 10 artists from the collection, with 72 works of art.

Walter O. Evans Collection of African American Art. Permanent Reserve II. A major private collection of 19th and 20th century African-American art; catalog of a traveling exhibition.

JOURNALS: American Visions , Black American Literature Forum , Black Arts Annual , Calalloo , International Review of African-American Art , Journal of Black Studies , Craft

Uncommon Beauty in Common Objects: the Legacy of African-American Craft Art. Includes the work of contemporary artists, with an essay on the links with African traditions. Portraits of artists, bibliography.

Harlem Renaissance Harlem on My Mind.The landmark 1968 exhibition at the Metropolitan Museum of Art; this edition includes a foreword by Henry Louis Gates.

Harlem Renaissance: Art of Black America. This exhibition was held at the Studio Museum of Harlem, one of the premier venues for African-American art. Includes chronologies of the HR, and a selected bibliography.

Boime. The Art of Exclusion: Representing Blacks in the Nineteenth Century.

Facing History: the Black Image in American Art, 1710-1940.

Image of the Black in Western Art.

Images of Blacks in American Culture: a Reference Guide to Information Sources. This major work on popular culture includes an important essay on imagery by David Driskell, as well as a useful chapter on resources and collections.

Portrayal of the Negro in American Painting [exhibition at Bowdoin College Museum of Art, 1964] The first major exhibition of Blacks in American art, from the 18th century to the 20th, arranged chronologically. Included the 'first known American painting in which a Negro is portrayed.'

Henks. Art of Black American Women: Works of Twenty-Four Artists of the Twentieth Century.

Moutoussamy-Ashe. Viewfinders: Black Women Photographers.

Afro-American Folk Culture: an Annotated Bibliography of Materials from North, Central, and South America, and the West Indies.

Black Authors and Illustrators of Children's Books: a Biographical Dictionary

Bardolph, Richgard. The Negro Vanguard, New York, 1959

Brawley, Benjamin. The Negro in Literature and Art in the United States, New York, 1921 (other dates published as well)

Cole, Natalie Robinson. Arts in the Classroom, New York, 1942

Locks, Alain. Negro Art: Past and Present, Washington, 1936

Motley, Willard F. "Negro Art in Chicago," Opportunity, XVIII (Janurary 1940)

Rodman, Selden. Horace Pippin: A Negro Painter in America. New York, 1947

Woodruff, Hale. Ten Negro Artists from the United States. Dakar, 1966

Aden, Alonzon Exhibition of Fine Arts Production by American Negroues, Dallas, Texas 1936

Apraxine, Pierre. Haitian Painting: The Naive Tradition,New York: American Federation of Arts, 1973

Reno, Dawn E. Collecting Black Americana New York: Crown Publishers Incorporated, 1986

A revised edition of a book which explores visual representation of black culture from the twentieth century and into the twenty first. 192 illustrations, 39 in colour, 181 bibliographical notes. Bio notes, select bib and sources, index, 272pp, UK. THAMES & HUDSON, 0500203628

2002 Paperback

 


HARLEM RENAISSANCE

Harlem stomp!: a cultural history of the Harlem Renaissance
by Laban Carrick Hill

Author: Hill, Laban Carrick

Explores the literary, artistic, and intellectual creativity of the Harlem Renaissance and discusses the lives and work of Louis Armstrong, Langston Hughes, Zora Neale Hurston, and other notable figures of the era.


New York: Little, Brown, c2003, 151 p.

Notes:
Megan Tingley books
Includes bibliographical references (p. 137-142) and index.


Reviews for this Title:
Kirkus Reviews As Nikki Giovanni says in her foreword, the Harlem Renaissance was "an American people redefining this great American nation." The rich cultural life of Harlem in the 1920s included the poetry of Langston Hughes, the photography of James VanDerZee, the painting of Aaron Douglas and William H. Johnson, the vocal performances of Paul Robeson. Harlem was the Jazz Age—Louis Armstrong, Duke Ellington, the Savoy Ballroom. This volume, clearly a labor of love, is a visual treat, from the cover art by Christopher Myers to the pages chock full of period photographs and artwork of the age. The narrative voice, though, is inconsistent, sometimes affecting the ebullient language of the "hoppin'" nightclubs and the "white hepcat from downtown," at other times sounding dry as an old textbook. The big bibliography doesn't reflect the wealth of resources available for young readers, but the volume offers much for browsers and young researchers. (index, credits) (Nonfiction. 12+)
(Kirkus Reviews, November 15, 2003)
ISBNs Associated with this Title:
0316814113 : Reinforced binding - Juvenile


Credits:
• Novelist/EBSCO Publishing
• Baker & Taylor
• Copyright 2005, VNU Business Media, Inc. All Rights Reserved
• Added to NoveList: 20050120
• TID: 131184


Encyclopedia of the Harlem Literary Renaissance
Format Hardcover
Subject Literary Criticism & Collections / African-American & Black
ISBN/SKU 081604967X
Author Lois Brown
Publisher Facts on File
Publish Date July 2005
Not yet published
Annotation
Provides authoritative coverage and unique insight into the literature of the Harlem Renaissance of the 1920s and 1930s, detailing the historical relevance of the time and explaining how each writer, work, or idea helped to reshape American literature.

Caribbean Crusaders And The Harlem Renaissance
Format Paperback
Subject Social Science / African-American Studies
ISBN/SKU 0252072413
Author Joyce Moore Turner
Publisher Univ of Illinois Pr
Publish Date July 2005

Look For Me All Around You: Anglophone Caribbean Immigrants In The Harlem Renaissance
Format Paperback
Subject
ISBN/SKU 081432987X
Author Louis J. Parascandola
Publisher Wayne State Univ Pr
Publish Date June 2005

Word, Image, And The New Negro: Representation And Identity In The Harlem Renaissance
Format Hardcover
Subject Literary Criticism & Collections / African-American & Black
ISBN/SKU 0253345839
Author ANNE ELIZABETH CARROLL
Publisher Indiana Univ Pr
Publish Date March 2005

Encyclopedia Of The Harlem Renaissance
Format Hardcover
Subject Reference / Encyclopedias
ISBN/SKU 157958389X
Author Cary D. Wintz (EDT)
Publisher Routledge
Publish Date January 2005

Review
/*Starred Review*/ The Harlem Renaissance continues to attract academic interest across disciplines, and this set reflects that interest as well as the diversity in scholarship devoted to the topic. Debate still rages among critics about the origins, scope, and legacy of the Harlem Renaissance. In 639 entries, this encyclopedia not only covers these and other expected aesthetic issues--literature, art, and music--but also the historical, political, and socioeconomic environment in which the movement took place. Almost half of the entries are biographical, encompassing actors, politicians, musicians, writers, patrons, and more. Other entries cover specific literary or theatrical works or productions; places (Apollo Theater, 135th Street Library); organizations (Black Star Line, Harlem Globetrotters, Negro Art Theater); and periodicals (Chicago Defender, The Nation). Also discussed are topics such as Blues, Federal Writer's Project, and White patronage. The series of entries headed Harlem Renaissance in the United States deals with the movement in Boston, California, and Chicago, among other places. The encyclopedia's more than 250 contributors range from academics to artists. Entries are alphabetically arranged and individually authored, and each one is followed by a list of "Further Reading." Many also contain see also references, and for artists, a list of major works (books, movies, recordings, etc.). Most entries are less than a page long, though substantive essays of about three to five pages are provided on some of the more influential artists, performers, or works. Other longer entries include topics like Art criticism and the Harlem Renaissance, Civil rights and law, Europe and the Harlem Renaissance (with subentries on Berlin, London, Paris, and the Soviet Union), and riots. There are even entries devoted to artists or works inspired by the Harlem Renaissance movement (for example, Sherwood Anderson's novel Dark Laughter). The entries are well written and cogent, particularly on sensitive or emotional topics like lynching and passing.The volumes also include 180 black-and-white photographs and a street map of Harlem, 1913-1930. This map highlights landmarks like the Apollo Theater and the Cotton Club as well as the residences of famous denizens like Langston Hughes and Marcus Garvey. There is also a very helpful thematic list of entries, with headings like "Nightlife," "Publishers," "Singers," and "Theater Companies." Overall, this is a significant and useful addition to reference works on the Harlem Renaissance, appealing to users seeking general outlines and summaries as well as to those needing specifics and references. It is accessible to readers on multiple levels and recommended for high-school, college, and public libraries. ((Reviewed December 15, 2004)) Copyright 2004 Booklist Reviews.


African-American Concert Dance: The Harlem Renaissance And Beyond
Format Paperback
Subject Performing Arts / Dance / General
ISBN/SKU 0252072618
Author John O. Perpener III
Publisher Univ of Illinois Pr
Publish Date January 2005

A Beautiful Pageant: African American Theatre, Drama, and Performance in the Harlem Renaissance, 1910-1927
Format Paperback
Subject History / United States / 20th Century
ISBN/SKU 1403965412
Author David Krasner
Publisher St Martins Pr
Publish Date July 2004

Annotation
A history of the performances and entertainments that fueled the Harlem Renaissance covers such topics as the prizefight between Jack Johnson and Jim Jeffries, the choreography of Aida Walker and Ethel Waters, and the writing of Zora Neal Hurston. Reprint.


Children's Literature of the Harlem Renaissance
Format Hardcover
Subject
ISBN/SKU 0253344433
Author Katharine Capshaw Smith
Publisher Indiana Univ Pr
Publish Date June 2004

Review
This readable and informative account looks at literature that "emerged from the program of racial 'uplift' that took hold in the 1890s" and, initially under the leadership of W.E.B. Du Bois, "spotlighted education as a chief factor in racial progress." Smith (Univ. of Connecticut) argues that, by neglecting children's literature, scholars of the New Negro Renaissance have ignored both "childhood as a site of emerging cultural nationalism" and the important "debates surrounding the nature and identity of black youth" in the early decades of the 20th century. In five chapters, the author treats The Brownies' Book and Crisis, which in whole or in part focused on African American children; drama for children that helped to identify and shape local and national African American communities; dialect and regional identities, especially the work of Paul Laurence Dunbar; Associated Publishers, a publishing house that issued children's books promoting racial amity and black cultural pride; and the work of Langston Hughes and Arna Bontemps, who used "aesthetics to change readers' viewpoints on race." Highlighting little-known authors and works, this book raises issues about the political and social intent of all children's literature as it creates stories and promotes themes designed to "explain" life to younger generations. Summing Up: Essential. Lower-division undergraduates through faculty; general readers. Copyright 2005 American Library Association.

Ebony Rising: Short Fiction of the Greater Harlem Renaissance Era
Format Paperback
Subject
ISBN/SKU 0253216753
Author Craig Gable (EDT)
Publisher Indiana Univ Pr
Publish Date June 2004

Review
Librarian and scholar Gable's Harlem Renaissance fiction anthology is the most comprehensive and dynamic to date, containing 52 short stories by 37 writers that span 27 years, from "Hope Deferred" by Alice Dunbar-Nelson, published in 1914, to "Girl, Colored" by Marian Minus, published in 1940--two stories, interestingly enough, about work, sacrifice, and survival. Seeking breadth and variety rather than the era's "greatest hits," Gable has created a lively spectrum of works by the famous and overlooked alike that address myriad subjects--poverty, family, work, race, love, violence, migration, faith, and politics--in diverse styles. Gable has focused on stories that have never before been anthologized, and taken pains to illuminate the social and historical context of each tale by presenting them chronologically in conjunction with enlightening time lines that pointedly keep a running count of each year's lynchings. This genuine literary treasure trove showcases radiant, clever, melodramatic, funny, suspenseful, and affecting stories by Angelina Weld Grimke, Jean Toomer, Zora Neale Hurston, Claude McKay, Nella Larsen, Arna Bontemps, Rudolph Fisher, Richard Wright, and Chester Himes. ((Reviewed February 15, 2004)) Copyright 2004 Booklist Reviews.

Black Women Poets of Harlem Renaissance
Format Paperback
Subject Literary Criticism & Collections / African-American & Black
ISBN/SKU 0761826173
Author Emmanuel E. Edgar
Publisher Rowman & Littlefield Pub Inc
Publish Date November 2003

Review
Egar (English, U. of Arkansas-Pine Bluff) hopes to provoke academic discussion as well as to validate the poetic achievements of five Black women. While the men used poetry as war songs, he says, the women used it to articulate the Black spirit. There is no index. Annotation ©2004 Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)


Encyclopedia of the Harlem Renaissance
Format Hardcover
Subject
ISBN/SKU 0816045399
Author Aberjhani
Publisher Facts on File
Publish Date September 2003

Annotation
Contains approximately 370 alphabetically arranged entries covering the emergence of new ideas in literature, political thought, civil rights, racial pride, and the arts during New York City's Harlem Renaissance in the 1920s and 1930s.


Review
This alphabetical reference contains approximately 370 entries covering the emergence of new ideas in political thought, civil rights, racial pride, and the arts during New York City's Harlem Renaissance in the 1920s and 1930s. Ranging from several paragraphs to several pages in length, the cross-referenced entries include people, places, and institutions such as Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters, Louis Armstrong, Apollo Theatre, Gwendolyn Brooks, Abyssinian Baptist Church, Regina Andrews, and Marcus Garvey. The reference includes a chronology, a glossary of slang, maps, and some 100 black and white photographs. Aberjhani and West are both experienced writers and editors who have published nonfiction, fiction, and poetry. Annotation (c) Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

The Collected Writings of Wallace Thurman: A Harlem Renaissance Reader
Format Paperback
Subject History / United States / 20th Century
ISBN/SKU 0813533015
Author Wallace Thurman
Publisher Rutgers Univ Pr
Publish Date August 2003

Review
This important anthology rescues from near-oblivion one of the giants of the Harlem Renaissance, both as author and editor. The material included, a sizable portion of it previously unpublished, is divided into eight sections according to genre or topic. Four of them comprise essays--on Harlem, on social topics, on literature, and on major black leaders and facets of black life, the last group written as a planned collection titled Aunt Hagar's Children. The remaining four sections comprise correspondence, poetry and short stories, two full-length plays and accompanying commentary on one, and excerpts from three published novels. The quality of writing varies markedly, with the literary essays and plays among the strongest, the poems the weakest. The chronology and the introductions to the volume and each section are helpful. But scholars will be frustrated by the failure of the editors (both Rhode Island College) to provide the requisite scholarly apparatus for this kind of endeavor, including clear principles for the selection of letters included and their recipients, annotations for numerous people mentioned in the letters, and consistency of information provided. Summing Up: Recommended. Lower- and upper-division undergraduates; general readers. Copyright 2004 American Library Association.


Passing Novels in the Harlem Renaissance: Identity Politics and Textual Srategies
Format Paperback
Subject Social Science / African-American Studies
ISBN/SKU 3825858421
Author Mar Gallego
Publisher Transaction Pub
Publish Date August 2003

The Harlem Renaissance
Format Library
Subject Juvenile Nonfiction / Literary Criticism & Collections
ISBN/SKU 0791076792
Author Harold Bloom (EDT)
Publisher Chelsea House Pub
Publish Date August 2003

Annotation
Presents essays that document the origins and influence of the Harlem Renaissance, focusing on key writing figures and artists and the many challenges they faced.

The Harlem Renaissance
Format School and Library
Subject Juvenile Nonfiction / History / General
ISBN/SKU 1403401500
Author Adam Scgaefer
Publisher Heinemann Library
Publish Date July 2003

Annotation
Describes the time period known as the Harlem Renaissance, during which African American artists, poets, writers, thinkers, and musicians flourished in Harlem, New York.


Review
Double-page spreads, crowded with captioned archival photographs and reproductions, introduce the African-American writers, artists, and intellectuals who participated in the Harlem Renaissance of the early twentieth century. Boxed text provides interesting asides to give a more complete picture of the influences on this remarkable exposition of talent. Reading list, timeline. Glos., ind. Copyright 2004 Horn Book Guide Reviews.


The Harlem Reader: A Celebration of New York's Most Famous Neighborhood, from the Renaissance Years to the Twenty-First Century
Format Paperback
Edition 1ST
Subject Fiction / Anthologies (Multiple Authors)
ISBN/SKU 1400046815
Author Herb Boyd (EDT)
Publisher Random House Inc
Publish Date May 2003

Annotation
A remarkable anthology of fiction, nonfiction, memoir, poetry, and other narratives provides a rich kaleidoscopic portrait of Harlem at diverse points in its history from the Harlem Renaissance to the present day, as seen through the eyes of Malcolm X, Maya Angelou, langston Hughes, Chester Himes, Duke Allington, Sidney Poitier, Ruby Dee, and others. Original. 15,000 first printing.


Review
Harlem, the symbolic capital of black America, engenders many complex and sometimes contradictory images. From the black literary and cultural renaissance of the 1920s to the upper-middle-class enclave of Sugar Hill, where the likes of Duke Ellington and W. E. B. Dubois lived, this Harlem produced Langston Hughes, James Weldon Johnson, Zora Neale Hurston, and Claude McKay. But there was a political Harlem of Adam Clayton Powell Jr and Percy Sutton; a militant Harlem of Malcolm X and Marcus Garvey; and a tragic Harlem, where junkies live only for the next drug fix. Boyd skillfully blends these perspectives with numerous others in a collection of fiction and essays by noted as well as lesser-known writers into a coherent whole that reflects upon the dramatic forces and players helping to shape Harlem and its centrality in America's culture and consciousness. From the renaissance to its fall from grace, Harlem has reflected crosscurrents in American culture. This anthology will draw readers interested in Harlem's past and concerns about its future as it is revitalized and gentrified. ((Reviewed April 15, 2003)) Copyright 2003 Booklist Reviews

Rereading the Harlem Renaissance: Race, Class, and Gender in the Fiction of Jessie Fauset, Zora Neale Hurston, and Dorothy West
Format Hardcover
Subject Literary Criticism & Collections / African-American & Black
ISBN/SKU 0313323267
Author Sharon L. Jones
Publisher Greenwood Pub Group
Publish Date December 2002

Review
Jones (English, Earlham College) reassesses the traditional genres applied to African-American literature in this volume. Using close readings of an exhaustive sampling of the works of Fauset, Hurston, and West, Jones argues that their writings reflect a complex interweaving of the folk, bourgeois, and proletarian aesthetics that are traditionally held to be separate genres. Annotation (c) Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

Harlem Renaissance: A Gale Critical Companion
Format Hardcover
Subject Literary Criticism & Collections / Reference
ISBN/SKU 0787666181
Author Janet Witalec (EDT)
Publisher Gale Group
Publish Date October 2002

Annotation
Offers an introduction to the Harlem Renaissance and presents thirty-five entries on major authors and their works, including literary criticism and a complete bibliography for each author.


Review
Intended for upper-high-school and undergraduate students, Harlem Renaissance spans three volumes. Volume 1 focuses on five topic areas, starting with an overview and background information, then moving on to chapters on social, economic, and political factors; publishing and periodicals; performing arts; and the visual arts. Each chapter averages about 100 pages and follows a standard pattern of organization. For example, the chapter discussing the performing arts begins with a two-page introduction followed by a list of representative works and a collection of primary materials. Essays reprinted from other sources provide overviews of performing arts during the Harlem Renaissance and discussions of drama, film, and music. Each chapter ends with a list of further readings. Reading lists are excellently annotated and current but neglect Internet sites.Volumes 2 and 3 are devoted to writers. Eleven female and twenty-two male authors are discussed, among them Arna Bontemps, Marcus Garvey, Angelina Weld Grimke, James Weldon Johnson, and Dorothy West. Entries average 30 to 50 pages, the shortest being 7 pages. Most author entries include biographical profiles, lists of principal works, some primary source material, critical essays, and further reading lists. For example, the entry on Zora Neale Hurston includes, among other items, the short story "Spunk," nine complete critical essays reprinted from other sources, and a one-and-one-half page listing of further readings, including cross-references to other Gale titles. Two illustrations are included within the section on Hurston, a photo of the author and a playbill cover. Illustrations are in black and white and of good quality but used sparingly throughout the set. Each volume contains a cumulative author index, title index, and subject index plus a chronology outlining key events between 1890 and 1937.Although much of the content is available elsewhere, including other publications from Gale (according to the preface there is 15 percent or less overlap with Gale's Literary Criticism series), it is useful to have so much material brought together and presented in this particular context. The breadth and depth of Harlem Renaissance make it a valuable and unique reference source for academic, public, and high-school libraries. A resource with a similar title, Harlem Renaissance (UXL, 2000), is better suited for younger audiences. ((Reviewed April 15, 2003)) Copyright 2003 Booklist Reviews

Black Stars of the Harlem Renaissance
Format Paperback
Subject Juvenile Nonfiction / Biography & Autobiography / People Of Color
ISBN/SKU 0471211524
Author James Haskins (EDT)
Publisher John Wiley & Sons Inc
Publish Date September 2002

Annotation
A thoroughly researched collection of profiles offers well-rounded portraits of twenty notable African Americans from the Harlem Renaissance, unsung heroes as well as the famous and the legendary. Original.

The Harlem Renaissance: A Celebration of Creativity: A Celebration of Creativity
Format School and Library
Subject Juvenile Nonfiction / Ethnic / African-American
ISBN/SKU 1567666450
Author Lucia Raatma
Publisher Childs World
Publish Date August 2002

Annotation
An introduction to the period in the 1920s known as the Harlem Renaissance, when the expression of African American creativity in many forms flourished.


Gay Rebel of the Harlem Renaissance: Selections from the Work of Richard Bruce Nugent
Format Paperback
Subject Art / Individual Artist
ISBN/SKU 0822329131
Author Bruce Nugent
Publisher Duke Univ Pr
Publish Date June 2002

Annotation
One of the first gay African Americans to openly pronounce his homosexuality speaks out on the Harlem Renaissance through selections from his writing and his art. Simultaneous.


Review
For 30 years--until James Baldwin published his Giovanni's Room (1956)--Nugent (1906-87) was the only openly gay African American writer. Born in Washington, DC, to a light-skinned family, he moved after his father's death to New York, where his mother could pass for white and earn wages higher than she could in Washington. Both a visual artist and a writer during the Harlem Renaissance, and even a member of the original Broadway cast of Porgy, Nugent is finally given the chance to speak for himself in this volume. The book includes several poems; excerpts from an unpublished novel; vignettes of such Harlem personalities as Georgette Harvey, Rose McClendon, Blanche Dunn, Alexander Gumby, Carl Van Vechten; four Bible stories in the tradition of the European aesthetes who conflated homosexuality with biblical characters; and other writings. Color plates of his flamboyant Salome in the style of Erte and his homoerotic Gilgamesh drawings in the style of Beardsley are stunning. In the introduction, Wirth (an independent scholar and Nugent's friend for the six years before his death) contextualizes Nugent's work in the Harlem Renaissance and comments on the selections he includes. Academic collections at all levels. Copyright 2002 American Library Association


Artists and Writers of the Harlem Renaissance
Format Library
Subject Juvenile Nonfiction / History / Renaissance
ISBN/SKU 0766018342
Author Wendy Hart Beckman
Publisher Enslow Pub Inc
Publish Date June 2002

Annotation
Profiles the lives of ten artists and writers of the Harlem Renaissance, including Langston Huges, Bessy Smith, and Duke Ellington, discussing their backgrounds, the stuggles they faced, and their acomplishments.


Review
Gr 7-10-The array of individuals collected in this book reflects the diverse creative areas that came together in the cultural flourishing of the African-American community in New York City in the early 20th century. Following a brief introduction to the Harlem Renaissance, 10 poets, musicians, dancers, essayists, and novelists are introduced in 8- or 9-page chapters, each one illustrated with two black-and-white photographs. Bessie Smith, Duke Ellington, Langston Hughes, and Josephine Baker are among those included; information on all of the people is readily available elsewhere, but this is a serviceable introduction to the topic.-Janet Woodward, Garfield High School, Seattle, WA Copyright 2002 Cahners Business Information.

The Harlem Renaissance in American History
Format Library
Subject Juvenile Nonfiction / Ethnic / African-American
ISBN/SKU 0766014584
Author Ann Gaines
Publisher Enslow Pub Inc
Publish Date March 2002

Review
Gr 7 Up-This serviceable overview covers the period in the 1920s when many aspects of African-American culture merged in Harlem. The book traces the intellectual life that flourished there from its roots in the Great Migration of blacks from the South after the turn of the century and the rise of activist organizations that promoted racial equality, such as the NAACP. The contributions of public figures and artists such as W. E. B. DuBois, Langston Hughes, Zora Neale Hurston, Claude McKay, and James Weldon Johnson are outlined, as is the period's legacy. Black-and-white photos are scattered throughout the text. James Haskins's Harlem Renaissance (Millbrook, 1996) is more detailed and offers more insight and examples.-Janet Woodward, Garfield High School, Seattle, WA Copyright 2002 Cahners Business Information.

The Ideologies of African American Literature: From the Harlem Renaissance to the Black Nationalist Revolt
Format Hardcover
Subject Literary Criticism & Collections / African-American & Black
ISBN/SKU 0742509494
Author Robert E. Washington
Publisher Rowman & Littlefield Pub Inc
Publish Date October 2001

Review
The premise of this exciting work on the sociology of US black literature is that literary works depict social worlds that shape our perceptions of social reality, in this case the reality of black life. Washington (sociology, Bryn Mawr) discusses each of the five black literary schools from 1920 to 1970 in terms of the origins, sociohistorical settings, and literary texts of its major writers: the Primitivist School and Claude McKay, Langston Hughes, Jean Toomer, Countee Cullen; the Naturalistic Protest School and Richard Wright; the Existentialist School and Ralph Ellison; the Moral Suasion School and James Baldwin; the Counterhegemonic Black Cultural Nationalist School and Amiri Baraka. Except for the last, the literature of each school should be understood in terms of its cultural dependency on liberal white Americans for financial support and cultural confirmation. The white cultural establishment played a crucial role; black literary works over the years represent an exercise in co-optive hegemony by liberal whites. An extremely impressive book offering a provocative interpretation that is certain to be discussed and argued about. Upper-division undergraduates and above. Copyright 2002 American Library Association

Double-Take: A Revisionist Harlem Renaissance Anthology
Format Paperback
Subject Fiction / Anthologies (Multiple Authors)
ISBN/SKU 0813529301
Author Venetria K. Patton (EDT)
Publisher Rutgers Univ Pr
Publish Date August 2001

Review
Arranged by author, 23 essays and 155 creative pieces represent the artistic and intellectual range of the Harlem Renaissance. Featuring the work of women and men in equal numbers, and including overlooked writers as well as the major figures of the period, the book assembles poetry, short stories, drama, essays, and song lyrics. Artwork and illustrations from periodicals of the time are also included. Essays discuss the history of Harlem, jazz, discrimination against African Americans, and sexism. Brief biographies precede the work of each writer. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

Deep River: Music and Memory in Harlem Renaissance Thought
Format Hardcover
Subject History / United States / General
ISBN/SKU 0822325772
Author Paul Allen Anderson
Publisher Duke Univ Pr
Publish Date June 2001

Review
Roots for the musical flourishing of the Harlem Renaissance certainly include the New York residency in the 1890s of Anton^D'in Dvo^D%r^D'ak, who encouraged young American composers to see the spiritual as the start toward a national music. It was further stimulated ten years later with the visits of African British composer Samuel Coleridge-Taylor, a true cultural hero. Already, however, variant perceptions had been expressed--those of W.E.B. Du Bois contrasting with the ideas of Booker T. Washington. The aim of many of the musicians of the Harlem Renaissance was the "elevation" of the folkloric--perhaps best realized by William Grant Still's ^IAfro-American Symphony^R (1930) and the African American lyric tenor of Roland Hayes--but others objected to the refinement that idealization of the heritage produced. Richly informed, Anderson (American culture and African American studies, Univ. of Michigan) discusses all this and penetrates the conflicting philosophies of the era that also produced Duke Ellington, Bessie Smith, and Billie Holiday. The author encourages consideration not only of these variant manifestations, but also those that do not fit into the mainstream of the various idioms of the time. Almost 40 pages of endnotes add to the scholarly scope of this examination, amplified by a highly selective but most relevant bibliography. Upper-division undergraduates through faculty and professionals. Copyright 2002 American Library Association


Extraordinary People of the Harlem Renaissance
Format Paperback
Subject Juvenile Nonfiction / Art / General
ISBN/SKU 0516271709
Author P. Stephen Hardy
Publisher Scholastic Library Pub
Publish Date March 2001

Annotation
Looks at the many artists, photographers, choreographers, musicians, composers, poets, writers, and other creative people who made Harlem such an amazing place in the 1920s and 1930s.


Review
Gr 4-8-This clearly written book is packed with information on 44 notable individuals of the period. Well-known figures such as W. E. B. Du Bois, Marcus Garvey, Langston Hughes, Countee Cullen, and Bessie Smith are included as are lesser-known people such as Laura Wheeler Waring and May Howard Jackson. Several pages of information are provided for each subject. Essays on "The New Negro," "The Jazz Age," and publications and patrons of the Harlem Renaissance are also included. There are vivid black-and-white photographs of individuals, groups, and productions as well as reproductions of covers of magazines and sheet music, and artwork. While this book is ideal for research papers, it can also be read from cover to cover by students interested in the arts or the era.-Tammy K. Baggett, Atlanta-Fulton County Public Library, GA Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information.

Jean Toomer and the Harlem Renaissance
Format Paperback
Subject Literary Criticism & Collections / African-American & Black
ISBN/SKU 0813528461
Author Genevieve Fabre (Edt)
Publisher Rutgers Univ Pr
Publish Date December 2000

Review
The outgrowth of a January 1998 Paris conference on the Harlem Renaissance, this volume is the latest entry in the ongoing reappraisal of the fascinating and enigmatic Jean Toomer. Ably introduced by Fabre and Feith, the 12 essays by new and established scholars from Europe and the US revisit the debates about art and aesthetics, politics, race, and cultural identity that have shaped Toomer scholarship over the past several decades. Eight essays examine Toomer's widely acknowledged masterpiece ^ICane^R, with scholars like Werner Sollers and George Hutchinson locating Toomer within his social and intellectual milieu while Yves-Charles Grandjeat, Fran^D,coise Clary, C^D'ecile Coquet, Monica Michlin, and Fabre offer close readings of Toomer's themes, techniques, and poetics. Other essays examine Toomer's relationships to his contemporaries in the US and Europe, his relationship to his publisher Horace Liveright, his views about race and eugenics, and his reception in France. An excellent selected bibliography concludes the volume. An engaging collection of essays, this book is an excellent contribution to American and African American studies. Recommended for undergraduates through faculty. Copyright 2001 American Library Association

The Harlem Renaissance: An Annotated Reference Guide for Student Research
Format Hardcover
Subject Art / General
ISBN/SKU 1563085801
Author Marie E. Rodgers
Publisher Libraries Unlimited Inc
Publish Date May 1998

Annotation
Offers descriptions of nonfiction books and nonprint materials about the people and the culture of the Harlem Renaissance


Review
Offers detailed descriptions of nonfiction books and nonprint materials on the people and culture of the Harlem Renaissance, most published within the last 15 years, for students in 7th through 12th grades. Annotations describe organization and content of the work, tell how it is relevant to the Harlem Renaissance, and note recommended audience. Entries are ordered in sections on historical and biographical references, notable contributors, literature and writing, visual and performing arts, and sports and entertainment. Includes many brief biographies of key figures, and b&w photos. Annotation c. by Book News, Inc., Portland, Or.


Harlem Renaissance
Format Hardcover
Subject Juvenile Nonfiction / Social Science / General
ISBN/SKU 0787648361
Author Kelly King Howes
Publisher Gale Group
Publish Date September 2000

Annotation
Describes the events and people who contributed to the flowering of artistic and intellectual achievement in 1920s Harlem

Langston Hughes: Poet of the Harlem Renaissance
Format Library
Subject Juvenile Nonfiction / Biography & Autobiography / General
ISBN/SKU 0894908154
Author Christine M. Hill
Publisher Enslow Pub Inc
Publish Date October 1997

Annotation
Surveys the private life and literary accomplishments of the writer whose varied works reflect the traditions, feelings, and experiences of African Americans.


Review
Gr 6-10?This look at the poet's life and times includes the same basic facts that many other biographers have recorded and does so in a clear, easy-to-read narrative. The text flows smoothly and is written in an engaging style that will hold students' interest. Good-quality, black-and-white photographs add to the presentation; the captions are largely informative with the exception of a portrait of Hughes with an unidentified statue. Although this book is functional, it is not as attractive or as encompassing as Milton Meltzer's more complete Langston Hughes (Millbrook, 1997). Far less intimidating than that title, particularly for reluctant readers, Hill's book is a suitable addition.?Marilyn Fairbanks, East Junior High School, Brockton, MA

The Harlem Renaissance
Format Library
Subject Juvenile Nonfiction / Art / General
ISBN/SKU 0791025977
Author Veronica Chambers
Publisher Chelsea House Pub
Publish Date September 1997

Annotation
Recounts the vibrant personalities and remarkable cultural movements that flourished in America's leading Black community during the 1920s and 1930s


Review
Gr. 7^-12. Part of the African-American Achievers series, like De Angelis' Black Cowboys on p.1002, this sophisticated, in-depth history discusses how Harlem became the center of a great 1920s black cultural revolution that enriched the nation. Chambers weaves together accounts of the leading artists, writers, musicians, and intellectuals--Langston Hughes, Countee Cullen, Zora Neale Hurston, W. E. B. Du Bois, James van der Zee, and many more--with an overview of the social and political forces of the time. Her approach is celebratory, but she also analyzes the bitter conflicts within the African American artistic community, as well as the influence, good and bad, of the whites who helped make Harlem popular. The writing style is sometimes flat, but Chambers is at her best in talking about individual works of art from a social and an aesthetic point of view. There are interesting black-and-white photos throughout as well as a small central insert with full-color art and fascinating commentary. Quotes are carefully attributed, and there's a bibliography but no footnotes. ((Reviewed February 15, 1998)) Copyright 2000 Booklist Reviews

The Harlem Renaissance in Black and White
Format Paperback
Subject Literary Criticism & Collections / African-American & Black
ISBN/SKU 0674372638
Author George Hutchinson
Publisher Harvard Univ Pr
Publish Date February 1997

The Harlem Renaissance: Hub of African-American Culture, 1920-1930
Format Paperback
Edition REPRINT
Subject
ISBN/SKU 0679758895
Author Steven Watson
Publisher Random House (P)
Publish Date September 1996

Annotation
Features biographical sketches of the singers, musicians, poets, authors, and dancers who flourished in Harlem's cultural renaissance

Shimmy Shimmy Shimmy Like My Sister Kate: Looking at the Harlem Renaissance Through Poems
Format Hardcover
Subject
ISBN/SKU 0805034943
Author Nikki Giovanni (EDT)
Publisher Henry Holt & Co
Publish Date April 1996

Annotation
Includes poems by such authors as Paul Laurence Dunbar, Langston Hughes, Countee Cullen, Gwendolyn Brooks, and Amiri Baraka, with commentary and a discussion of the development of African American arts known as the Harlem Renaissance.


Review
Gr 9 Up A remarkable collection of poetry from the Harlem Renaissance and beyond, stitched together with commentary by Giovanni. Paul Laurence Dunbar, Langston Hughes, Robert Hayden, Ntozake Shange, and Gwendolyn Brooks are among the powerful voices included. W.E.B. DuBois, not primarily known as a poet, is shown here to be one of accomplishment. After each poem, Giovanni points out, in a readable, almost conversational style, the poet's significance and relationship to the movement. The choice of poems is sometimes idiosyncratic, and the reminiscences are quite personal and sometimes quirky. But Giovanni is always on the mark, even when she pursues a tangent, and always comes back to the role of the Harlem Renaissance in influencing African American artists. As the book progresses, the poetry becomes more difficult, and those who seek to use it as a textbook should be prepared to help students understand some of the selections. There are some serious, provocative, and violent themes, but this title is an important resource for those interested in poetry and in understanding the African American experience. Ruth K. MacDonald, Bay Path College, Longmeadow, MA Copyright 1998 School Library Journal Reviews

Claude McKay: Rebel Sojourner in the Harlem Renaissance : A Biography
Format Paperback
Edition REPRINT
Subject Biography & Autobiography / Literary
ISBN/SKU 080712074X
Author Wayne F. Cooper
Publisher Louisiana State Univ Pr
Publish Date March 1996

The Harlem Renaissance, 1920-1940: Interpretation of an African American Literary Movement
Format Hardcover
Subject
ISBN/SKU 0815322119
Author Cary D. Wintz (EDT)
Publisher Taylor & Francis
Publish Date February 1996

Review
The seven volumes of this set are available separately (and Library of Congress has catalogued them individually). They are as follows: v.1: The Emergence of the Harlem Renaissance (2212-7, $75); v.2: The Politics and Aesthetics of "New Negro" Literature (2213-5, $78); v.3: Black Writers Interpret the Harlem Renaissance (2214-3, $82); v.4: The Critics and the Harlem Renaissance (2215-1, $75); v.5: Remembering the Harlem Renaissance (2216-X, $79); v.6: Analysis and Assessment, 1940-1979 (2217-8, $83); and v.7: Analysis and Assessment, 1980-1984 (2218-6, $80). The collection combines two approaches to the study of the era. The first five volumes include essays, articles, lectures, speeches, book reviews, and letters by participants in the Harlem Renaissance and their contemporaries who define and evaluate this literary movement. The final two volumes contain essays on the subject written by historians, literary critics, and other scholars. Most of the articles are reproduced here in facsimile (presumably through the miracle of computer scanning); fonts and type sizes vary, though most are perfectly legible, and plenty of typesetting money was saved. No indexing. Annotation c. by Book News, Inc., Portland, Or.

Women of the Harlem Renaissance
Format Paperback
Subject
ISBN/SKU 0253209803
Author Cheryl A. Wall
Publisher Indiana Univ Pr
Publish Date October 1995

Review
Traditional studies of the Harlem Renaissance often neglect women writers. Moving women from the margin to the center, Wall (English, Rutgers Univ.) examines the lives and work of novelists Jessie Redmon Fauset, Zora Neale Hurston, and Nella Larsen and such poets as Georgia Douglas Johnson and Annie Scales Spencer. By connecting the women to one another, to the cultural movement in which they worked, and to other early 20th-century women writers, Wall deftly defines their place in American literature. Her biographical and literary analysis surpasses others by following up on diverse careers that often ended far past the end of the movement. Highly recommended for collections on African Americans, women, and 20th-century America.?Brenda M. Brock, SUNY at Buffalo Copyright 1995 Cahners Business Information.


The Portable Harlem Renaissance Reader
Format Paperback
Subject
ISBN/SKU 0140170367
Author David L. Lewis (EDT)
Publisher Penguin USA
Publish Date June 1995

Annotation
Features essays, memoirs, poetry, and fiction from a select group of authors who wrote during the Harlem Renaissance of the 1920s

Voices from the Harlem Renaissance
Format Paperback
Edition REPRINT
Subject
ISBN/SKU 0195093607
Author Nathan Irvin Huggins (EDT)
Publisher Oxford Univ Pr
Publish Date January 1995

Within the Circle: An Anthology of African American Literary Criticism from the Harlem Renaissance to the Present
Format Paperback
Subject
ISBN/SKU 0822315440
Author Angelyn Mitchell (EDT)
Publisher Duke Univ Pr
Publish Date December 1994

Review
Presenting a wide spectrum of 20th century African American literary and cultural criticism, this anthology gathers together the important essays which initiated and gave critical definition to specific periods or movements of African American literature. It covers the Harlem Renaissance; humanistic/ethical criticism and the protest tradition; the Black Arts Movement; structuralism, post-structuralism, and the African American critic; and gender, theory, and African American presence in America. Lacks a subject index. Annotation copyright Book News, Inc. Portland, Or.

Classic Fiction of the Harlem Renaissance
Format Paperback
Subject
ISBN/SKU 019508196X
Author William L. Andrews (EDT)
Publisher Oxford Univ Pr
Publish Date May 1994

Black American Poets and Dramatists: Before the Harlem Renaissance
Format Paperback
Subject
ISBN/SKU 0791022307
Author Harold Bloom (EDT)
Publisher Chelsea House Pub
Publish Date May 1994

Annotation
Offers brief profiles of Black writers, including Paul Laurence Dunbar and Phillis Wheatley

Black Music in the Harlem Renaissance: A Collection of Essays
Format Paperback
Subject Music / Ethnomusicology
ISBN/SKU 0870498002
Author Samuel A. Floyd (Edt)
Publisher Univ of Tennessee Pr
Publish Date May 1993

Review
Paper edition of the 1990 Greenwood Press work which was initiated as a special issue of Black Music Research Journal but grew too big for that format. Ten essays address a variety of subjects connected with African-American music of the 1920s, e.g. vocal concert music, musical theater, Duke Ellington, and the relationship of the music to literature and art. Includes an extensive bibliography of works composed during the period. Annotation copyright Book News, Inc. Portland, Or.


Voices of a Black Nation: Political Journalism in the Harlem Renaissance
Format Paperback
Subject
ISBN/SKU 0865432031
Author Theodore G. Vincent (Edt)
Publisher Africa World Pr
Publish Date April 1991

Wines in the Wilderness: Plays by African American Women from the Harlem Renaissance to the Present
Format Hardcover
Subject
ISBN/SKU 0313265097
Author Elizabeth Brown-Guillory (EDT)
Publisher Greenwood Pub Group
Publish Date August 1990

Modernism and the Harlem Renaissance
Format Paperback
Subject
ISBN/SKU 0226035255
Author Jr. Baker, Houston A.
Publisher Univ of Chicago Pr
Publish Date January 1989

Color, Sex and Poetry: Three Women Writers of the Harlem Renaissance
Format Paperback
Subject
ISBN/SKU 0253204305
Author Gloria T. Hull
Publisher Indiana Univ Pr
Publish Date June 1987

Annotation
Offers profiles of three poets, examines their writings, and assesses their role in the Harlem Renaissance movement

The Harlem Renaissance: An Historical Dictionary for the Era
Format Hardcover
Subject
ISBN/SKU 0313232326
Author Bruce Kellner (Edt)
Publisher Greenwood Pub Group
Publish Date December 1984

Annotation
Portrays the lives of Black authors, musicians, actors, and other artists associated with the Harlem Renaissance and discusses Harlem Renaissance dramas, films, books, and musical shows


Harlem Renaissance.
Format Paperback
Subject
ISBN/SKU 0195016653
Author Nathan Irvin Huggins
Publisher Oxford Univ Pr
Publish Date February 1973

Annotation
Critically evaluates the intellectual and creative achievements of the black artists who contributed to the cultural renaissance of the 1920's


MUSIC

Allen, William Francis, comp. Slave Songs of the United States: The
Complete Original Collection (136 Songs). New York: Oak
Publications, 1965.


Bikel, Theodore. From Bondage to Freedom. Elektra EKL 200.
(Phonodisc).


Burlin, Natalie Curtis. Hampton Series Negro Folk-Songs. New York:
G. Schirmer, 1918-19. Arranged for male quartet.


Carawan, Guy, and Candie Carawan, comps. Freedom Is a Constant
Struggle: Songs of the Freedom Movement, with Documentary
Photographs. New York: Oak Publications, 1968.


Coleridge-Taylor, Samuel. Twenty-four Negro Melodies. Transcribed for
the piano by S. Coleridge-Taylor. With a preface by Booker T.
Washington. Musicians Library, vol. 17. Philadelphia: O. Ditson
Co., 1905.Samuel Coleridge-Taylor's Opus 59.


Fisk Jubilee Singers. Folkways Records FP 72, 1955.


Fitzgerald, Ella, and Louis Armstrong. Ella and Louis. Verve
MGV-4003.


Gellert, Lawrence, comp. "Me and My Captain" (Chain Gangs): Negro
Songs of Protest from the Collection of Lawrence Gellert.
Arranged for voice and piano by Lan Adomian. New York:
Hours Press, 1939.


Gillespie, Dizzy. "Groovin' High" with Dizzy Gillespie. Savoy MG
12020.


Handy, William Christopher. Unsung Americans Sung. New York:
Handy Brothers Music Co., 1944.


Kennedy, Robert Emmet. Mellows, a Chronicle of Unknown Singers.
New York: Albert and Charles Boni, 1925.


Monk, Thelonious. Genius of Modern Music. 2 disks. Blue Note 1510,
1511.


Morton, Jelly Roll. The Collected Piano Music. Edited by James
Dapogny. Washington, DC: Smithsonian Institution Press; New
York: G. Schirmer, 1982.


Negro Melodies, Minstrels and Songsters, 1850-1902. Millwood, NY:
Kraus-Thomson Organization, 1970. Microfilm.

This microfilm roll contains reproductions of a
number of books including Frederick Jerome Work's New Jubilee
Songs as Sung by the Fisk Jubilee Singers of Fisk University,
Nashville, TN: Fisk University, 1902.


Niles, John Jacob. Singing Soldiers. New York: Charles Scribner's
Sons, 1927.


Parker, Charlie. Genius of Charlie Parker. Savoy MG 12014.


Reagon, Bernice. A History of the Afro American through His Songs: A
Report of a Workshop Presented by Miss Bernice Reagon. Albany,
NY: University of the State of New York, State Education
Dept., Division of Humanities and Arts, 1969.

This work includes a book and two phonotapes.
Sackheim, Eric, comp. The Blues Line: A Collection of Blues Lyrics.
New York: Schirmer Books, 1975.


Still, William Grant, arr. Twelve Negro Spirituals. Edited by
Wellington Adams. New York: Handy Brothers Music Co., 1937-48.

Talley, Thomas Washington, comp. Negro Folk Rhymes, Wise and
Otherwise, with a Study. 1922. Reprint. Port Washington, NY:
Kennikat Press, 1968.


Tirro, Frank. Jazz: A History. New York: Norton, 1977.


Waller, Fats. Real Fats Waller. RCA Camden CAL-473.

Baker, David N., Lida M. Belt, and Herman C. Hudson. The Black
Composer Speaks. A project of the Afro-American Arts Institute
of Indiana University. Metuchen, NJ: Scarecrow, 1977.


Balliett, Whitney. Jelly Roll, Jabbo, and Fats: 19 Portraits in Jazz.
New York: Oxford University Press, 1983.


Charters, Samuel Barclay. Bluesmen: The Story and the Music of the
Men Who Made the Blues. 2 vols. New York: Oak Publications,
1967-1977.


_____. Jazz: New Orleans, 1885-1963, An Index to the Negro Musicians
of New Orleans. Rev. ed. New York: Oak Publications, 1963.


Dobrin, Arnold. Voices of Joy, Voices of Freedom: Ethel Waters,
Sammy Davis, Jr., Marian Anderson, Paul Robeson, Lena Horne.
New York: Coward, McCann and Geoghegan, 1972.


Fernett, Gene. Swing Out: Great Negro Dance Bands. Midland, MI:
Pendell Publishing Co., 1970.


Handy, D. Antoinette. Black Women in American Bands & Orchestras.
Metuchen, NJ: Scarecrow, 1981.


Harrison, Daphne Duval. Black Pearls: Blues Queens of the 1920s.
New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University Press, 1988.


Horricks, Raymond. Count Basie and His Orchestra, Its Music and Its
Musicians. New York: Citadel Press, 1957.


Hughes, Langston. Famous Negro Music Makers. New York: Dodd,
Mead, 1955.


Kimball, Robert, and William Bolcom. Reminiscing with Sissle and
Blake. New York: Viking Press, 1973.


Marsh, J.B.T. The Story of the Jubilee Singers: With Their Songs.
Rev. ed. Boston: Houghton, Osgood, 1880.


This is "in part an abridgment of the two Jubilee histories...
written by the Rev. G. D. Pike."
Mitchell, George. Blow My Blues Away. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State
University Press, 1971.


Shapiro, Nat, and Nat Hentoff, eds. Hear Me Talkin' to Ya: The Story
of Jazz by the Men Who Made It. New York: Rinehart, 1955.


Southern, Eileen. Biographical Dictionary of Afro-American and African
Musicians. Westport, CT: Greenwood, 1982.


Trotter, James M. Music and Some Highly Musical People: Containing
Brief Chapters on I. A Description of Music. II. The Music of
Nature. III. A Glance at the History of Music. IV. The Power,
Beauty, and Uses of Music. Following Which Are Given Sketches
of the Lives of Remarkable Musicians of the Colored Race. With
Portraits, and an Appendix Containing Copies of Music Composed
by Colored Men. Boston: Lee and Shepard; New York: C. T.
Dillingham, 1880.

 

Allen, Robert Raymond. Singing in the Spirit: An Ethnography of
Gospel Performance in New York City's African-American Church
Community. Ann Arbor, MI: University Microfilms
International, 1988. Photocopy.


The author's Ph.D. Thesis from the University of
Pennsylvania, 1987.
Baraka, Imanu Amiri [LeRoi Jones]. Black Music. New York: W.
Morrow, 1967.


_____. Blues People: Negro Music in White America. New York: W.
Morrow, 1963.


The Black Perspective in Music. Cambria Heights, NY: Foundation for
Research in the Afro-American Creative Arts, 1973-. Periodical.


Blesh, Rudi, and Harriet Janis. They All Played Ragtime, the True Story
of American Music. Rev. with new additional material. New
York: Oak Publications, 1966.


Buerkle, Jack Vincent, and Danny Barker. Bourbon Street Black: The
New Orleans Black Jazzman. New York: Oxford University
Press, 1973.


Evans, David. Big Road Blues: Tradition and Creativity in Folk Blues.
Berkeley: University of California Press, 1982.


Ferris, William R. Blues from the Delta. Garden City, NY: Anchor
Press/Doubleday, 1978.


Heilbut, Anthony. The Gospel Sound: Good News and Bad Times.
Updated and rev., 1st Limelight ed. New York: Limelight
Editions, 1985. Originally published: Garden City, NY: Anchor
Press/Doubleday, 1975.


Hentoff, Nat. Jazz Is. New York: Random House, 1976.


Jones, LeRoi. See Baraka, Imanu Amiri.
Keck, George R., and Sherrill V. Martin, eds. Feel the Spirit: Studies
in Nineteenth-Century Afro-American Music. Contributions in
Afro-American and African Studies, no. 119. New York:
Greenwood, 1988.


Keil, Charles. Urban Blues. Chicago: University of Chicago Press,
1966.


Kofsky, Frank. Black Nationalism and the Revolution in Music. New
York: Pathfinder Press, 1970.


Longstreet, Stephen. Sportin' House: A History of the New Orleans
Sinners and the Birth of Jazz. Los Angeles: Sherbourne Press,
1965.


Jackson, Irene V., ed. More than Dancing: Essays on Afro-American
Music and Musicians. Prepared under the auspices of the
Center of Ethnic Music, Howard University. Westport, CT:
Greenwood, 1985.


Morse, David. Motown and the Arrival of Black Music. New York:
Macmillan, 1971.


Oliver, Paul. Songsters and Saints: Vocal Traditions on Race Records.
New York: Cambridge University Press, 1984.


Russell, Ross. Jazz Style in Kansas City and the Southwest. Berkeley:
University of California Press, 1971.


Samuels, William Everett. Union and the Black Musician: The Narrative
of William Everett Samuels and Chicago Local 208. Edited by
Donald Spivey. Lanham, MD: University Press of America, 1984.


Shaw, Arnold. Black Popular Music in America: From the Spirituals,
Minstrels, and Ragtime to Soul, Disco, and Hip-Hop. New York:
Schirmer Books, 1986.


_____. Honkers and Shouters: The Golden Years of Rhythm and Blues.
New York: Macmillan, 1978.


Southern, Eileen, comp. Readings in Black American Music. New
York: W. W. Norton, 1972.


Tanner, Paul, and Maurice Gerow. A Study of Jazz. 2nd ed.
Dubuque, IA: W. C. Brown Co, 1973.


Toop, David. The Rap Attack: African Jive to New York Hip Hop.
Boston: South End Press, 1984.


Walker, Wyatt T. "Somebody's Calling My Name": Black Sacred Music
and Social Change. Valley Forge, PA: Judson Press, 1979. (C,
783.67, W186, 80-28919).

 

Brown, Rae Linda. Music, Printed and Manuscript, in the James Weldon
Johnson Memorial Collection of Negro Arts and Letters. Critical
Studies on Black Life and Culture, vol. 23. Garland Reference
Library of the Humanities, vol. 277. New York: Garland, 1982.


De Lerma, Dominique-Rene. Bibliography of Black Music. 4 vols.
Westport, CT: Greenwood, 1981-1984.


Ferris, William R., jr. Mississippi Black Folklore: A Research
Bibliography and Discography. Hattiesburg: University and
College Press of Mississippi, 1971.


Floyd, Samuel A., and Marsha J. Reisser. Black Music in the United
States: An Annotated Bibliography of Selected Reference and
Research Materials. Millwood, NY: Kraus International
Publications, 1983. (C, 781.7296073, F645, 84-32934).
Gray, John, comp. Blacks in Classical Music: A Bibliographical Guide
to Composers, Performers, and Ensembles. Music Reference
Collection, no. 15. New York: Greenwood, 1988.


Handy, William Christopher. Negro Authors and Composers of the
United States. New York: Handy Brothers Music Co., 1938.


Hoffmann, Frank W., and George Albert, comps. The Cash Box Black
Contemporary Album Charts, 1975-1987. Metuchen, NJ:
Scarecrow, 1989.


Rust, Brian. Jazz Records, 1897-1942. 2 vols. 4th rev. and enl. ed.
New Rochelle, NY: Arlington House Publishers, 1978.


Skowronski, JoAnn. Black Music in America: A Bibliography.
Metuchen, NJ: Scarecrow, 1981.


Spencer, Jon Michael. As the Black School Sings: Black Music
Collections at Black Universities and Colleges with a Union List
of Book Holdings. Music Reference Collection, no. 13. New York:
Greenwood, 1987.


Tudor, Dean, and Nancy Tudor. Jazz. Littleton, CO: Libraries
Unlimited, 1979.


Turner, Patricia. Afro-American Singers: An Index and Preliminary
Discography of Long-Playing Recordings of Opera, Choral Music,
and Song. Minneapolis, MN: Challenge Productions, 1977.

Blacks in Classical Music: A Bibliographical Guide to Composers, Performers, and Ensembles (Music Reference Collection)
ISBN: 0313260567
Author: John A. Gray John Gray (Compiler)
Publisher: Greenwood Press
Date published: 1988-06-20
Format: Hardcover
Number of pages: 290


White, Evelyn Davidson, comp. Choral Music by Afro-American
Composers: A Selected, Annotated Bibliography. Metuchen, NJ:
Scarecrow, 1981.


Williams, Brett. John Henry, A Bio-bibliography. Westport, CT:
Greenwood, 1983.

A New Anthology of Art Songs by African American Composers
Format Paperback
Edition BOOK & CD
Subject Music / Songbooks
ISBN/SKU 0809325233
Author Margaret R. Simmons (EDT)
Publisher Southern Illinois Univ Pr
Publish Date May 2004
Table of Contents
Foreword vii
William Brown

Acknowledgments ix
Introduction xi
H. Leslie Adams

Amazing Grace
1 (9)
from Nightsongs

Creole Girl
10 (6)
from The Wider View

Love Come and Gone
16 (7)
My Man
23 (14)
Mable Bailey

from Child's World

Seven Days
37 (3)
Birthday Song
40 (2)
Seasons
42 (5)
Charles S. Brown

Black Sheep, Black Sheep
47 (3)
Leisure Cruise
50 (2)
Pied Beauty
52 (6)
Wallace McClain Cheatham

from The Giovanni Songs

Three/Quarters Time
58 (3)
Adolphus Hailstork

from Songs of Love and Justice (On texts of Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.)

Difficulties
61 (5)
from Five Dunbar Lyrics

The Awakening
66 (4)
Good Night
70 (5)
Create in Me
75 (8)
Jacqueline B. Hairston

On Consciousness Streams

On Consciousness Streams
83 (2)
Thou Alone Canst Inspire
85 (2)
The Season of Remembrance
87 (6)
William H. Henderson

from Five Songs for Soprano and Piano

Valentine's Day
93 (4)
How Should I Your True Love Know
97 (3)
Jeraldine Saunders Herbison

from Five Art Songs for Voice and Piano

I'll Not Forget
100 (2)
We Met by Chance
102 (2)
Betty Jackson King

Theology
104 (4)
Compensation
108 (5)
William Foster McDaniel

from Four Love Songs

Gramercy Park
113 (5)
Union Square
118 (6)
Undine Smith Moore

Lyric for Truelove
124 (8)
Byron Motley and Barbara Sherrill

from The Moods of My People

Daedalus, Fly Away Home
132 (4)
Mae's Rent Party
136 (2)
Club Woman
138 (1)
Robert Owens

Heart
139 (4)
Girl
143 (9)
Havana Dreams
152 (6)
Nadine Shanti

Clear Water
158 (6)
Frederick Tillis

Singing for the Sake of My Soul
164 (12)
Dolores White

Velvet Shoes
176 (5)
Nails
181 (4)
That Black Reef
185 (6)
Julius P. Williams

A Song
191 (4)
Contributors 195